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Moderator/Admin Dude!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The rebuild has started. Here is a link to the mishap thread:


 

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I'm in awe of people who can do this stuff.... way out of my skill set....

This is amazing , I would have called that car dead.
 

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This is going to be fun to follow.
 
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I've been a subscriber to their channel for a while and was happy to see they got one. They do pretty much everything themselves and are building a nice shop mostly on their own too. Looking forward to seeing both get done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You get to see the inner workings of the new 500 as they start tearing apart the car.

 

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Wow, this looks a little more difficult than my wife’s 1000 piece puzzle. Can’t imagine putting this back together, all the power to them and to the next owner
 
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I still wonder where he will get a replacement wheel and how he verify whether or not any of the other wheels suffered damage in the structural integrity.

Definitely a lofty endeavor! It will be interesting to see the final product once completed.
 

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I've been following this too. I keep thinking about how much it will cost for all new air bags. Isn't that gonna be some serious coin???
And what about all of the coolers and heat extractors that are GT500 specific? Where is he gonna find those? Does Ford have those on hand to sell the general public yet?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've been following this too. I keep thinking about how much it will cost for all new air bags. Isn't that gonna be some serious coin???
And what about all of the coolers and heat extractors that are GT500 specific? Where is he gonna find those? Does Ford have those on hand to sell the general public yet?
New GT500 specific parts are difficult to acquire and the problem sourcing salvaged parts these guys are most likely having is most of the wrecked cars have frontal damage.

I’m rooting for them, but they have a big mountain to climb.
 

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I think that it's fun to watch people rebuild wrecks, and I haven't watched many of Kondor's previous videos, but most of people in these videos and that I know personally do not, and probably can not, rebuild modern unibody cars properly. I'm comp sci and an EE, not a mechanical engineer, but I've spent enough time working for an OEM and working as a supplier to see how modern cars are designed and built to be highly skeptical of how someone without the correct resources (e.g. factory adhesives that are heat-cured in a body-shell oven) can deliver even a near-factory result.

I think what a lot of people overlook is that most cars are assembled using a variety of tools and processes that aren't easily reproduced, even at the dealer level, and I think are beyond the scope of capabilities for aftermarket garages. I'm not an expert in Mustang assembly, but I see that Ford is using adhesives in certain areas:


...and I question how diligent these "YouTube personalities" are when rebuilding cars with structural damage that requires, for example, sophisticated and temperamental adhesives.

Another consideration is that all modern high-volume vehicle platforms are designed in modelling systems, where critical assumptions are made about the properties of structural materials and I'm not sure that hammering, stretching and heating key structural components will result in a body that has the same energy absorption characteristics that it had when it left the factory.

"But Mike, you pompous bastard" I hear you say, "thousands of cars receive major body repair every year and I don't see these cars just falling apart as they pull out of people's driveways" to which I would have to concede. I would suggest that most of these were repaired by factory trained-and-equipped dealers and have good chance of being safe and serviceable for the rest of their normal service lives. That's not what we're talking about here - many of these "YouTube" shops are following a lowest-cost, easiest-to-do path and the results are dubious at best and potentially dangerous at worst.

TL;DR - I don't think that YouTubers can properly repair wrecked late-model cars.
 

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I have also wondered about how much he will spend on replacement parts. I know that Ford seems to be pretty proud of parts for these cars and have things priced accordingly. I can see he has sourced some used parts to curb rebuild costs and seems to be getting a decent deal on them form the amounts he is saying he paid.

From his first video it sounded like he paid about $31,500 (before taxes and fees) for the car. To Mike’s point, most people that I know of that buy wrecked and rebuild to sell tend to find ways to cut costs on the rebuilds. I am not saying this is what’s being done in this case. But still wonder, given the damage visible in the videos, parts, frame pulling, paint, etc, how he would get back together and still make a reasonable profit...if he intends to sell it.

Should we run a pool on what he’s going to ask for it if he’s going to sell it? $75k? $70k? $65k? :)
 

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I think that it's fun to watch people rebuild wrecks, and I haven't watched many of Kondor's previous videos, but most of people in these videos and that I know personally do not, and probably can not, rebuild modern unibody cars properly. I'm comp sci and an EE, not a mechanical engineer, but I've spent enough time working for an OEM and working as a supplier to see how modern cars are designed and built to be highly skeptical of how someone without the correct resources (e.g. factory adhesives that are heat-cured in a body-shell oven) can deliver even a near-factory result.

I think what a lot of people overlook is that most cars are assembled using a variety of tools and processes that aren't easily reproduced, even at the dealer level, and I think are beyond the scope of capabilities for aftermarket garages. I'm not an expert in Mustang assembly, but I see that Ford is using adhesives in certain areas:


...and I question how diligent these "YouTube personalities" are when rebuilding cars with structural damage that requires, for example, sophisticated and temperamental adhesives.

Another consideration is that all modern high-volume vehicle platforms are designed in modelling systems, where critical assumptions are made about the properties of structural materials and I'm not sure that hammering, stretching and heating key structural components will result in a body that has the same energy absorption characteristics that it had when it left the factory.

"But Mike, you pompous bastard" I hear you say, "thousands of cars receive major body repair every year and I don't see these cars just falling apart as they pull out of people's driveways" to which I would have to concede. I would suggest that most of these were repaired by factory trained-and-equipped dealers and have good chance of being safe and serviceable for the rest of their normal service lives. That's not what we're talking about here - many of these "YouTube" shops are following a lowest-cost, easiest-to-do path and the results are dubious at best and potentially dangerous at worst.

TL;DR - I don't think that YouTubers can properly repair wrecked late-model cars.
This new Cobra is the same as a 1993 Cobra, very little has changed in terms of design. Same Uni Body construction. Guys have been rebuilding these cars since the very beginning. Will this car be as good as a brand new one - No. Will a person be able to tell that this car was a write off when completed on the street or at a car show - Probably not. As far as the performance aspect lets be real, this car along with 99% of other mustangs are going to spend most of their lives in someones garage and on nice sunny days will go for an hour cruise for ice cream. The performance loss is negligible. I personally think this guy paid too much for this car, the price to fix will put him into what other used 2020's that have not been written off will go for in a year or two. But as a YouTuber and for views he will come out ahead for sure and there was a price of entry for that. I am looking forward to seeing the side damage and what he plans on doing about it to fix it. Also I hope he shares what some of these more unique pieces cost him to replace.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
very little has changed in terms of design.
As an owner of a 93 Cobra and a 20 GT500, I am scratching my head once again at another one of your posts. These cars are waaaaay different in every aspect! Are they both Mustangs... yup! Are they both unibodies... yup! That’s it... they are as different as a Mercedes and a Camaro.
 

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As an owner of a 93 Cobra and a 20 GT500, I am scratching my head once again at another one of your posts. These cars are waaaaay different in every aspect! Are they both Mustangs... yup! Are they both unibodies... yup! That’s it... they are as different as a Mercedes and a Camaro.
Take them apart. They are the same design and construction. Uni body 4 seater. Watch these videos from this guy. Once he gets this car to bare you will see it looks identical to a 1987 Mustang 4cyl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Take them apart. They are the same design and construction. Uni body 4 seater. Watch these videos from this guy. Once he gets this car to bare you will see it looks identical to a 1987 Mustang 4cyl.
Have you been under each of these cars you are referencing...? I have. They are nothing alike whatsoever. Now, my SN-95 Cobras (94/95/96) all look identical to the predecessor (93) when looking at the bottom side. The SN-95 was basically a new body dropped onto a Fox platform. The S550 GT500 is 100% completely different and not even remotely similar to the 93.
 

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The chasis is different dimensions but designed in the same way. Watching this video proves it. Uni body. Front support frame, firewall, spot welds and bolted together - all the same as previous generations. Not sure what your point is? The new Mustang is built like a Mercedes? Ok, which model are you referencing and why do you think this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The chasis is different dimensions but designed in the same way. Watching this video proves it. Uni body. Front support frame, firewall, spot welds and bolted together - all the same as previous generations. Not sure what your point is? The new Mustang is built like a Mercedes? Ok, which model are you referencing and why do you think this?
I have crawled around and under both vehicles you mention many times. They are nothing alike. The IRS alone make the new 500 a different animal, which affects the rear structure.

By using your thought process, one could argue that ANY 2-door front engine unibody vehicles are the same.
 
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