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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I did a full brake upgrade outside of changing the calipers.



Started by removing the front and rear calipers, rotors and brake lines (hoses).

On the front I installed the FRPP cooling kit backing plates.



After spraying my new cross drilled/slotted rotors with brake anti-squeal, I installed them.





* Note: Rotors are directional and marked as such *


Then installed the new Porterfield pads front and rear.




The front pads were easy, just pry apart a little, push out these pins and the pads pull straight out.



The rear caliper were a pain in the butt!!

Everyone told me they just turned in and then pop the pads in.

It was a pain trying to turn in the pistons on the rear, I did not buy a tool because everyone told me they turn in easily w/o one.

Then I installed the front and rear Stainless lines by Goodridge.

* Note: Each line is made specific for each wheel. *

This is all that installed.





Then I bled the system. I had a volunteer (Co Pilot) work the pedal, as I bled the brakes. I started from the pass. rear and bled till I got good flow (took a little bit) then the drivers rear, pass front and drivers front. As I did the front I did the outside bleeders first and then the inside (fronts have 2 bleeders each). In the meantime I kept a check on the fluid level. Then I did a once around again and topped off the reservoir...not to the top so as not to get that leak everyone is talking about. (mine does not leak because I don't overfill it). It was relatively easy to bleed this car, the bleeders are placed high so the air quickly comes out. I used one container to flush the whole system, and had another on hand for backup.



Then I installed the brake cooling kit.

Pretty straight forward, just find a good path and make sure they can reach and contract w/o interference.




Then I installed my custom made Grill inserts.





Took probably 3-4 hours w/o a lift.



I'd also like to thank Fred, George and Badboy Dave for their help and input!!
 

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Nice work.:bigthumb: Be sure and post impressions of the changes.

Cal
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nice work.:bigthumb: Be sure and post impressions of the changes.

Cal
I need to get some miles on it before trying out on my favorite backroads.
 

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Nice job Bill as usual ! I have to purchase new cooling hoses for mine this week as I have finished my cooling ducts too. I figure 4 feet on each side will be enough is that about right ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nice job Bill as usual ! I have to purchase new cooling hoses for mine this week as I have finished my cooling ducts too. I figure 4 feet on each side will be enough is that about right ?
I did not measure what was in the FRPP kit, but I believe that is about right.

I did not cut them at all, i stuffed them in thinking it would give them as much room as they needed to expand and contract.

I did forget to recheck them after a 50 mile ride I made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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I did a full brake upgrade outside of changing the calipers.



Started by removing the front and rear calipers, rotors and brake lines (hoses).

On the front I installed the FRPP cooling kit backing plates.



After spraying my new cross drilled/slotted rotors with brake anti-squeal, I installed them.





* Note: Rotors are directional and marked as such *


Then installed the new Porterfield pads front and rear.




The front pads were easy, just pry apart a little, push out these pins and the pads pull straight out.



The rear caliper were a pain in the butt!!

Everyone told me they just turned in and then pop the pads in.

It was a pain trying to turn in the pistons on the rear, I did not buy a tool because everyone told me they turn in easily w/o one.

Then I installed the front and rear Stainless lines by Goodridge.

* Note: Each line is made specific for each wheel. *

This is all that installed.





Then I bled the system. I had a volunteer (Co Pilot) work the pedal, as I bled the brakes. I started from the pass. rear and bled till I got good flow (took a little bit) then the drivers rear, pass front and drivers front. As I did the front I did the outside bleeders first and then the inside (fronts have 2 bleeders each). In the meantime I kept a check on the fluid level. Then I did a once around again and topped off the reservoir...not to the top so as not to get that leak everyone is talking about. (mine does not leak because I don't overfill it). It was relatively easy to bleed this car, the bleeders are placed high so the air quickly comes out. I used one container to flush the whole system, and had another on hand for backup.



Then I installed the brake cooling kit.

Pretty straight forward, just find a good path and make sure they can reach and contract w/o interference.




Then I installed my custom made Grill inserts.





Took probably 3-4 hours w/o a lift.



I'd also like to thank Fred, George and Badboy Dave for their help and input!!



Great job Bill,and you're welcome.Just for the record if you would have asked me I would have told you,you definetely need the piston seat tool.I have done mine and helped a lot of people with this and you have to seat that piston all the way down or you won't get that pad over the rotor.:info-smilie: I know you are aware of this now and you will never forget:bandit: You should be real happy with your setup.Remember to break in those pads before you do any more smokey burnout videos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Great job Bill,and you're welcome.Just for the record if you would have asked me I would have told you,you definetely need the piston seat tool.I have done mine and helped a lot of people with this and you have to seat that piston all the way down or you won't get that pad over the rotor.:info-smilie: I know you are aware of this now and you will never forget:bandit: You should be real happy with your setup.Remember to break in those pads before you do any more smokey burnout videos.
I have heard about 300 miles to break them in good, I don't know where that number came from though??


I suppose I need to find this brake tool for the next time I change them out. I have read that going to a track for a few days can eat up 1/2 your pads.
 

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I did a full brake upgrade outside of changing the calipers.



Started by removing the front and rear calipers, rotors and brake lines (hoses).

On the front I installed the FRPP cooling kit backing plates.



After spraying my new cross drilled/slotted rotors with brake anti-squeal, I installed them.





* Note: Rotors are directional and marked as such *


Then installed the new Porterfield pads front and rear.




The front pads were easy, just pry apart a little, push out these pins and the pads pull straight out.



The rear caliper were a pain in the butt!!

Everyone told me they just turned in and then pop the pads in.

It was a pain trying to turn in the pistons on the rear, I did not buy a tool because everyone told me they turn in easily w/o one.

Then I installed the front and rear Stainless lines by Goodridge.

* Note: Each line is made specific for each wheel. *

This is all that installed.





Then I bled the system. I had a volunteer (Co Pilot) work the pedal, as I bled the brakes. I started from the pass. rear and bled till I got good flow (took a little bit) then the drivers rear, pass front and drivers front. As I did the front I did the outside bleeders first and then the inside (fronts have 2 bleeders each). In the meantime I kept a check on the fluid level. Then I did a once around again and topped off the reservoir...not to the top so as not to get that leak everyone is talking about. (mine does not leak because I don't overfill it). It was relatively easy to bleed this car, the bleeders are placed high so the air quickly comes out. I used one container to flush the whole system, and had another on hand for backup.



Then I installed the brake cooling kit.

Pretty straight forward, just find a good path and make sure they can reach and contract w/o interference.




Then I installed my custom made Grill inserts.





Took probably 3-4 hours w/o a lift.



I'd also like to thank Fred, George and Badboy Dave for their help and input!!
Wow, You do nice work. Looks like you are ready for the track now. Be careful on the track.
 

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I have heard about 300 miles to break them in good, I don't know where that number came from though??


I suppose I need to find this brake tool for the next time I change them out. I have read that going to a track for a few days can eat up 1/2 your pads.


The # 300 came from the guy you bought them from,Jerry.:bandit:
 

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I have heard about 300 miles to break them in good, I don't know where that number came from though??


I suppose I need to find this brake tool for the next time I change them out. I have read that going to a track for a few days can eat up 1/2 your pads.
300 miles is the distance George would drive to fix your faucet. :boohoo:
 

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The # 300 came from the guy you bought them from,Jerry.:bandit:
I never understood a mileage given on brakes. If you leave your driveway in California and jump on the highway for 300 miles heading east, you may drive 300 miles and never use your brakes.

I'd tell people about how many stops they need to make. Or, when people would ask me "how many miles do I have left on my brake pads?", I'd say "well, there bout xx% worn...so I can help you do the math assuming similar driving circumstances as in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I never understood a mileage given on brakes. If you leave your driveway in California and jump on the highway for 300 miles heading east, you may drive 300 miles and never use your brakes.

I'd tell people about how many stops they need to make. Or, when people would ask me "how many miles do I have left on my brake pads?", I'd say "well, there bout xx% worn...so I can help you do the math assuming similar driving circumstances as in the past.
Since my brake install I have hit my brakes lightly 286 times, medium 372 times and sorta hard twice, how many more times before they are broken in?
 

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I never understood a mileage given on brakes. If you leave your driveway in California and jump on the highway for 300 miles heading east, you may drive 300 miles and never use your brakes.

I'd tell people about how many stops they need to make. Or, when people would ask me "how many miles do I have left on my brake pads?", I'd say "well, there bout xx% worn...so I can help you do the math assuming similar driving circumstances as in the past.


Porterfield has a procedure they advise for the 1st 300 miles.So the 300 mile statement is a little misleading,sorry.:info-smilie:
 
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