Ford Shelby GT500 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 120 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Joe G. suggested that some of us with oil catch cans monitor and report on how well they perform in the real world. It would be beneficial for other folks with the various types of catch cans to report on their results on this thread as well.

I have a Mike Norris Catch Can and have been monitoring the amount of oil that's collected versus miles. Here is a picture of my install.



Here are my initial results. Note that I do not drive my car hard. Initial observations are that the amount of oil collected versus miles does not appear to be a linear function.

The first time I emptied the can, I had gone 64 miles and it collected about 1 teaspoon of oil.



I emptied it again after 231 miles and the can had collected 2 teaspoons of oil. 3.6 times the miles but only twice the oil.



Yikes! almost time to change the oil. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,067 Posts
Cool - I started a movement!

Thanks for the info 6-Speed. There's been so many "yes this works" or "no, it won't work" opinions I thought it good to see some real world results.


Let's get more data!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
Cool - I started a movement!

Thanks for the info 6-Speed. There's been so many "yes this works" or "no, it won't work" opinions I thought it good to see some real world results.


Let's get more data!!
You want details? I was born on 11/23/1961 in Fort Wayne Indiana. Until the age of 2 I lived in a small house on the corner of ....
:D

But seriously, good thread and thanks to those posting for taking the time.



Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,067 Posts
You want details? I was born on 11/23/1961 in Fort Wayne Indiana. Until the age of 2 I lived in a small house on the corner of ....
:D

But seriously, good thread and thanks to those posting for taking the time.



Dave
Hey!!

No hijacking my only good idea here!!:mad:



;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
The discussion of these oil catch cans is interesting and the cars can indeed use one. Unfortunatly measuring oil collected per mile for various designs means nothing unless they are tested in the same car under the same driving conditions.

Different cars will have VASTLY different rates of blowby and oil consumption. Therefore the best oil seperator in a car with almost no blowby will show almost no oil, while an open catch can with very poor performance on a car with high blow by will show large quantities of oil.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,129 Posts
Cool - I started a movement!

Thanks for the info 6-Speed. There's been so many "yes this works" or "no, it won't work" opinions I thought it good to see some real world results.


Let's get more data!!


Joe,
you're giving me a movement:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,464 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
ok so which which is better a catch can type or a filter type?
a lot of the catch cans do not say much about them, so do they hae a filter of some sort or are just open inside?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,067 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,129 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
The Norris CC has some course filter material in the inlet chamber that sort of resembles brillo pad.

There are some pictures of the internals on this site:

http://www.mikenorrismotorsports.com/Billet_PCV_Catch_Cans.html
6-Speed

I spoke with Mike today and he was unsure about what hose set up that you had used. Do you care to share that so that I might duplicate what you have shown. I had been considering the Watts set up, but like this even better. Now just to get it in and on.

Thanks ILLEGAL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
6-Speed

I spoke with Mike today and he was unsure about what hose set up that you had used. Do you care to share that so that I might duplicate what you have shown. I had been considering the Watts set up, but like this even better. Now just to get it in and on.

Thanks ILLEGAL
You'll need at least 3 feet of 1/2" fuel-line hose. I cut one 14" long and another 18-1/2" long. I used the longer hose between the valve cover and CC. I took the PCV quick-disconnects off of a stock PCV hose assembly. I bought a new one (Crankcase Ventilation Tube - part number 7R3Z-6A664-AA) from Ford and used it for parts. The female -8AN connectors are Aeroquip socketless fittings part # FCM1513; you'll need two of them. Here's a source for these fittings:

http://www.racerpartswholesale.com/product/70/Aeroquip_Straight_Socketless_Fittings

Applying some motor oil on the barbs and the hose ends will make assembly much easier. I used a hair dryer to heat up the hose ends before pressing in the quick disconnects; they were a PITA to install on the hose. I applied a thin film of motor oil on the -AN female connector threads before threading them onto the catch can fittings.

I purchased the base catch can from Norris Motorsports and replaced the brass fittings with -8AN to 1/4 NPT fittings.

http://www.mikenorrismotorsports.com/Billet_PCV_Catch_Cans.html

Here are the part numbers for the Earl fittings that I used:

- 922107 – 90 degree -8AN male to 1/4" NPT swivel fitting
- 981607 – straight -8AN male to 1/4" NPT fitting

I just updated my CC to use a swivel 90 degree fitting on top. Works much better than the fixed one since you can not tell what direction that fitting will point once it's secured. The swivel fitting can be pointed in any direction after it's secured. I got the fittings from AN Plumbing:

http://www.anplumbing.com/shop/index.php?shop=&dept=Aluminum

I applied Loctite PST 567 thread sealer on all the NPT threads including the draincock (but NOT on the AN fitting threads). I let it cure for 24 hours before driving the car. I don't recommend using teflon plumber's tape for an oil type application. When I initially installed the CC, I did not apply any thread sealer to the draincock NPT threads and oil began to seep out the bottom; the Loctite thread sealer cured that. You can get 567 from Grainer.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/5A236

I used M10 stainless-steel hardware to mount the CC - all available from ACE hardware (3/8" hardware will work too):

- Bolt (Metric Stainless Steel (SS)) – M10-1.50 x 45 (ACE PN 44500-N), 1 each
- SS Lock Washer – M10 (ACE PN 4127-K), 1 each
- SS Washer – M10 (ACE PN 4122-E), 1 each
- SS Nut – M10-1.50 pitch (ACE PN 4048-F), 1 each
- SS Fender Washer – M10 (ACE PN 44998-F), 2 each
- Neoprene Washer – 3/8” x 1-1/4” (ACE PN 2864-D), 2 each
- Chrome Spacer – 3/8 x 3/4" (3/4" long, 3/8” ID hole; Cy-Chrome PN 940075, ACE may keep these locked up – just ask for their chrome hardware), 1 each

Make sure the CC is oriented as desired and secured in the bracket prior to installation on the car. A 3/32" allen set screw secures the can in the bracket. I secured the catch can in the bracket such that the straight fitting pointed aft and the distance from the top of the bracket to the top of the can is 3-3/8".

I used a single bolt to mount the catch can to an existing slotted hole in the passenger's side strut tower. If you have headers installed and they stick out more than the stock exhaust manifold to the point where the CC drain mounted in this location sits directly above the headers, you might consider another mounting option to keep any potential oil leaks from dripping on to the headers.

Put a fender washer on the bolt followed by a neoprene washer, then run it through the hole from the wheelwell side. Installing the bolt is all done by feel unless you first remove the wheel; there's not much room to work in there. On the engine bay side, install another neoprene washer and then a fender washer on the bolt. The neoprene washers and fender washers go on each side of the strut tower to protect the finish and it also serves to hold the bolt in the hole when assembling the rest of the hardware. This is followed by the spacer, the CC bracket, washer, lock washer and nut in that order.

Connect up the outlet hose to the straight AN fitting on the CC first. Be sure to oil the threads of the female AN connectors prior to threading them on. Use caution when tightening down the female AN fitting onto the straight fitting. This tends to turn the straight fitting in the can since there are only a few threads making contact with this fitting. Use a wrench to hold the staight fitting in place while tightening the mating connector. The same applies when loosening the connector. This is not an issue with the 90 degree fitting.

After the hoses are connected up and secure, check the draincock to make sure it is in the closed position. To be honest, I did not know how these radiator type draincocks worked. The screw is left-hand threaded so you have to turn it clock-wise to close and CCW to open. Since it is very important that the draincock be closed when you're driving around, I added these photos for anyone else like me who have never seen the inner workings of this device.

Drain Closed:


Drain Open:


When draining the CC, I found the draincock on the bottom to be difficult to loosen by hand since there's not much room to reach in there. I was able to place a 3/8" open-end wrench on one of the "T" handles of the draincock and a slight turn clock-wise will break it free. I place a small plastic Ziplock bag around the bottom of the can and drain the oil into it.



Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,067 Posts
Great write-up 6-Speed.

Thanks!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,129 Posts
You'll need at least 3 feet of 1/2" fuel-line hose. I cut one 14" long and another 18-1/2" long. I used the longer hose between the valve cover and CC. I took the PCV quick-disconnects off of a stock PCV hose assembly. I bought a new one from Ford and used that for parts. The female -8AN connectors are Aeroquip socketless fittings part # FCM1513.

Applying some motor oil on the barbs and the hose ends will make assembly much easier. I used a hair dryer to heat up the hose ends before pressing in the quick disconnects; they were a PITA to install on the hose. I applied a thin film of motor oil on the -AN female connector threads before threading them onto the catch can fittings.

I purchased the base catch can and replaced the brass fittings with -8AN to 1/4 NPT fittings. Here are the part numbers for the Earl fittings that I used:

- 922107 – 90 degree -8AN male to 1/4" NPT swivel fitting
- 981607 – straight -8AN male to 1/4" NPT fitting

I just updated my CC to use a swivel 90 degree fitting on top. Works much better than the fixed one since you can not tell what direction that fitting will point once it's secured. The swivel fitting can be pointed in any direction after it's secured. I got the fittings from AN Plumbing:

http://www.anplumbing.com/shop/index.php?shop=&dept=Aluminum

I also used Loctite PST 567 thread sealer on all the NPT threads including the draincock (but NOT on the AN fitting threads). I let it cure for 24 hours before driving the car. I don't recommend using teflon plumber's tape. You can get 567 from Grainer.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/5A236

I used M10 stainless-steel hardware to mount the CC - all available from ACE hardware (3/8" hardware will work too):

- Bolt (Metric Stainless Steel (SS)) – M10-1.50 x 45 (ACE PN 44500-N), 1 each
- SS Lock Washer – M10 (ACE PN 4127-K), 1 each
- SS Washer – M10 (ACE PN 4122-E), 1 each
- SS Nut – M10-1.50 pitch (ACE PN 4048-F), 1 each
- SS Fender Washer – M10 (ACE PN 44998-F), 2 each
- Neoprene Washer – 3/8” x 1-1/4” (ACE PN 2864-D), 2 each
- Chrome Spacer – 3/4" long, 3/8” ID hole (ACE may keep these locked up – just ask for their chrome hardware), 1 each

Make sure the CC is oriented as desired and secured in the bracket prior to installation on the car. A 3/32" allen set screw secures the can in the bracket. I secured the catch can in the bracket such that the straight fitting pointed aft and the distance from the top of the bracket to the top of the can is 3-3/8".

A single bolt is used to mount the catch can to an existing slotted hole in the passenger's side strut tower. Put a fender washer on the bolt followed by a neoprene washer, then run it through the hole from the wheelwell side. Installing the bolt is all done by feel unless you first remove the wheel; there's not much room to work in there. On the engine bay side, install another neoprene washer and then a fender washer on the bolt. The neoprene washers and fender washers go on each side of the strut tower to protect the finish and it also serves to hold the bolt in the hole when assembling the rest of the hardware. This is followed by the spacer, the CC bracket, washer, lock washer and nut in that order.

Connect up the outlet hose to the straight AN fitting on the CC first. Be sure to oil the threads of the female AN connectors prior to threading them on. Use caution when tightening down the female AN fitting onto the straight fitting. This tends to turn the straight fitting in the can since there are only a few threads making contact with this fitting. Use a wrench to hold the staight fitting in place while tightening the mating connector. The same applies when loosening the connector. This is not an issue with the 90 degree fitting.

After the hoses are connected up and secure, check the draincock to make sure it is in the closed position.



Hope this helps.



Sweeeeeeet man,nice job.:D
 
1 - 20 of 120 Posts
Top