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I was told today that us folks who put their Shelbys away for the winter should do at least these 2 things with our cars.

1-Store the car on jack stands.I have been told these tires are really suseptible to getting permanent flat spots over months of storage.

2-Disconnect and remove the battery.

Some people already know this and some do not..............07.................
 

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I was told today that us folks who put their Shelbys away for the winter should do at least these 2 things with our cars.

1-Store the car on jack stands.I have been told these tires are really suseptible to getting permanent flat spots over months of storage.

2-Disconnect and remove the battery.

Some people already know this and some do not..............07.................

thanks 07 will do, I was just gonna park mine, appreciate it.
 

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thanks 07 will do, I was just gonna park mine, appreciate it.


No problem.I just came in from the Shelby garage and centered it in the middle of the garage so I can still do whatever I want to it this winter.I hate the thought of just looking at it for 6 months.............07...................
 

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I was told today that us folks who put their Shelbys away for the winter should do at least these 2 things with our cars.

1-Store the car on jack stands.I have been told these tires are really suseptible to getting permanent flat spots over months of storage.

2-Disconnect and remove the battery.

Some people already know this and some do not..............07.................
07 just curious behind the rationale behind disconnecting the battery vs using a "battery tender" on it. If the battery is disconnected are all of the memory settings lost?

and a point of clarification....on jack stands. is the car to be stored with the suspension loaded or unloaded?

Thanks Teke
 

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07 just curious behind the rationale behind disconnecting the battery vs using a "battery tender" on it. If the battery is disconnected are all of the memory settings lost?

and a point of clarification....on jack stands. is the car to be stored with the suspension loaded or unloaded?

Thanks Teke

I believe it is best to get it out of the engine compartment because of the vapors from the battery and the tops should be off for venting.I guess it is a personal choice but would hate to get anything on my paint job or in the engine compartment.The only settings you will lose is the clock.As far as the suspension goes I think it should be unloaded but if I am wrong someone will jump on it.I will ask tomorrow if I get a chance.............07................
 

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I would do three other things for I store boats with outboard and inboard motors and they are as follows:

1) Make sure there was a fresh oil change as the chemical build up erodes crank and engine components.
2) Ethanol is your worst enemy so top off your fuel tank as ethanol attracts moisture and get a good fuel stabilizer and there are some great fuel treatments that can be acquired from boat suppliers as West Marine etc. This is most of a concern if your car is not being stored in a heated and moisture free envrionment.
3) Depending how long and the environment you store your vehicle in, marine fogging oil may be a consideration for the harshest of environments. It coats the cylinder walls to avoid corrosion against the harsh moisture build up and evaporation. This is an extreme measure but you may want to consider this last measure depending your geographical location. This last measure will probably require a spark plug change in summer after the enginge is run for while as it may foul your plugs.

Happy storage:)
 

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I believe it is best to get it out of the engine compartment because of the vapors from the battery and the tops should be off for venting.I guess it is a personal choice but would hate to get anything on my paint job or in the engine compartment.The only settings you will lose is the clock.As far as the suspension goes I think it should be unloaded but if I am wrong someone will jump on it.I will ask tomorrow if I get a chance.............07................
Definitely unloaded and battery should be brought indoors and a charge placed on it before storage and mid way through the season. I have dual batties on a eight year old boat and have followed this procedure and they are as good as new. Trickle charges are my preference and whether the battery is maintenace free or not depends on fluid levels.
 

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I know with my '71 Mach I always left everything as-is. I'd do my absolute best to start it, back it out of the garage once a week and even maybe up the driveway and around the block.
IMO, thats the best way to store cars, but I know thats not possible for everyone.
 

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I believe it is best to get it out of the engine compartment because of the vapors from the battery and the tops should be off for venting.I guess it is a personal choice but would hate to get anything on my paint job or in the engine compartment.The only settings you will lose is the clock.As far as the suspension goes I think it should be unloaded but if I am wrong someone will jump on it.I will ask tomorrow if I get a chance.............07................
Tops off for venting? I thought all batteries made today are sealed. Can someone verify that the caps are removable?

As for suspensions, I can help. I did suspension/alignments for 10 years. The springs will last longer (it may take 25 years before your springs start to sag vs. 15 years without doing it) if you jack up the car and remove most of the weight from it, as they will remain unloaded for that portion of the year. However, you must jack it up such that the springs are unloaded...you can't jack under the lower control arm and get any benefit from it. In addition, if you jack the car up, the frame will flex ever so slightly. Because of this, it is recommended to "crack" the doors slightly so that they are not in a "bind" condition for 6 months of winter. When I say "crack", I mean just about 1/4"....in other words, they still should not open when you pull on them....the door mechanism has like a 2-position lock. Now you're probably thinking..."but if I crack the doors, my dome light (and potentially courtesy lights) will be on and drain the battery". Read the next paragraph to address this.

As for the battery, there are several schools of thought. In the old days, guys removed the battery because when they stored their car with the doors cracked, it would drain the battery. They removed the battery so they could more easily keep it on a trickle charger or charge it periodically on a bench rather than draping cables over the header panel on the car. If you can figure out a way to keep any electrical drain from the battery while the doors are cracked, I'd recommend leaving the battery in the car and simply starting the car (while it's jacked up on stands) about once per month, letting the engine run, let it warm up, shift carefully through the gears and let the rear tires spin, manually spin the front tires, operate all the dash controls such as flapper valves for the AC system, emergency brake cable, etc....then shut it down for another month. Here is a web site with more info....note they say EITHER remove the battery or keep it charged. I vote for keeping it charged....it's not that much work. Running the engine for 10 minutes once per month will do this. Here is more info:

http://www.inct.net/~autotips/battstor.htm

One other suggestion. Air conditioners have an additive in the refrigerant that lubricates the seals in the A/C system. If you don't use your A/C all winter, this lubricant never circulates, and the seals will dry out prematurely. It doesn't happen fast, but nonetheless it happens. As a result, you should run the A/C each month for 1-2 minutes when you start the car. Note that you don't have to have the A/C control on "COLD" for this to work, you simply must have the A/C compressor running. As a matter of fact, when you use the defrost cycle in the winter in most newer cars, it automatically turns the A/C unit on...which accomplishes the same purpose.

I'm tired of typing...hope this helps.

Dave
 

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One other suggestion. Air conditioners have an additive in the refrigerant that lubricates the seals in the A/C system. If you don't use your A/C all winter, this lubricant never circulates, and the seals will dry out prematurely. It doesn't happen fast, but nonetheless it happens. As a result, you should run the A/C each month for 1-2 minutes when you start the car. Note that you don't have to have the A/C control on "COLD" for this to work, you simply must have the A/C compressor running. As a matter of fact, when you use the defrost cycle in the winter in most newer cars, it automatically turns the A/C unit on...which accomplishes the same purpose.

I'm tired of typing...hope this helps.

Dave
Thanks, Dave. I REALLY, REALLY recommend this one. I'm not a big fan of A/C, so I almost never use it. That turned out to be a very bad thing. My A/C compressor in my Dodge Ram is now shot and must be replaced. If I just turned it on once in a while I could have avoided an expensive repair.
 

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I know with my '71 Mach I always left everything as-is. I'd do my absolute best to start it, back it out of the garage once a week and even maybe up the driveway and around the block.
IMO, thats the best way to store cars, but I know thats not possible for everyone.
+1. That's exactly what I do with my Cobra...just fire it up every 2 weeks or so ...6 months won't hurt a thing. Only thing you'll need is a fuel stabilizer...so the octane doesn't degrade.
 

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Tops off for venting? I thought all batteries made today are sealed. Can someone verify that the caps are removable?

As for suspensions, I can help. I did suspension/alignments for 10 years. The springs will last longer (it may take 25 years before your springs start to sag vs. 15 years without doing it) if you jack up the car and remove most of the weight from it, as they will remain unloaded for that portion of the year. However, you must jack it up such that the springs are unloaded...you can't jack under the lower control arm and get any benefit from it. In addition, if you jack the car up, the frame will flex ever so slightly. Because of this, it is recommended to "crack" the doors slightly so that they are not in a "bind" condition for 6 months of winter. When I say "crack", I mean just about 1/4"....in other words, they still should not open when you pull on them....the door mechanism has like a 2-position lock. Now you're probably thinking..."but if I crack the doors, my dome light (and potentially courtesy lights) will be on and drain the battery". Read the next paragraph to address this.

As for the battery, there are several schools of thought. In the old days, guys removed the battery because when they stored their car with the doors cracked, it would drain the battery. They removed the battery so they could more easily keep it on a trickle charger or charge it periodically on a bench rather than draping cables over the header panel on the car. If you can figure out a way to keep any electrical drain from the battery while the doors are cracked, I'd recommend leaving the battery in the car and simply starting the car (while it's jacked up on stands) about once per month, letting the engine run, let it warm up, shift carefully through the gears and let the rear tires spin, manually spin the front tires, operate all the dash controls such as flapper valves for the AC system, emergency brake cable, etc....then shut it down for another month. Here is a web site with more info....note they say EITHER remove the battery or keep it charged. I vote for keeping it charged....it's not that much work. Running the engine for 10 minutes once per month will do this. Here is more info:

http://www.inct.net/~autotips/battstor.htm

One other suggestion. Air conditioners have an additive in the refrigerant that lubricates the seals in the A/C system. If you don't use your A/C all winter, this lubricant never circulates, and the seals will dry out prematurely. It doesn't happen fast, but nonetheless it happens. As a result, you should run the A/C each month for 1-2 minutes when you start the car. Note that you don't have to have the A/C control on "COLD" for this to work, you simply must have the A/C compressor running. As a matter of fact, when you use the defrost cycle in the winter in most newer cars, it automatically turns the A/C unit on...which accomplishes the same purpose.

I'm tired of typing...hope this helps.

Dave


Wow nice post Dave.Yes the caps are removeable.I already have mine off.
One other thing I should mention.If you take your battery out,1st open both doors and then remove battery.The windows come down a 1/4" when you open the door and goes back up after it is closed.If you don't open the doors the windows will hit the moulding when you open and close the doors with the battery out.
 

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Very informative post Dave!
thank you!
 

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Well said ShelbyWise......I am in San Francisco Bay Area.
I would hate to think I would not be able to drive my shelby for 1 month, let alone 6!
Well one thing is for sure.....we all practiced patients while waiting for our cars.

Good luck to all that have to wait for the snow to melt before driving again.
 

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Wow nice post Dave.Yes the caps are removeable.I already have mine off.
One other thing I should mention.If you take your battery out,1st open both doors and then remove battery.The windows come down a 1/4" when you open the door and goes back up after it is closed.If you don't open the doors the windows will hit the moulding when you open and close the doors with the battery out.
No sweat...glad to help. Besides, I may need some help tracking now that I have been segmented! Oh crap, don't tell rpretzel. I'll post more in the other thread about my status.

Dave
 

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No sweat...glad to help. Besides, I may need some help tracking now that I have been segmented! Oh crap, don't tell rpretzel. I'll post more in the other thread about my status.

Dave
Grrr Grrr Grumble Grumble ;)
 

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So I woke up today to find the streets covered in that wondeful white stuff. That means the salt trucks will be going out and in turn my shelby is done till next spring. I will be putting her on the jack stands and unplugging the battery. I love christmas but its a sad feeling to know that I cant drive the shelby, or my usual daily driver for that matter ( a 96 cobra with the mystique paint). Welcome to the world of four cylinder-front wheel drive-economy car driving. Its kinda depressing just to say it. well good luck to all of those that life in the sunny climate all year round and make sure to take care of those cars.
 

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I was told today that us folks who put their Shelbys away for the winter should do at least these 2 things with our cars.

1-Store the car on jack stands.I have been told these tires are really suseptible to getting permanent flat spots over months of storage.

2-Disconnect and remove the battery.

Some people already know this and some do not..............07.................
I'm driving mine..."slick as snot on a doorknob" tires and all.

A couple of quick notes. With a recent technology battery tender (or the like), it isn't necessary to remove the battery. Just hook it up and forget it.
The downside to unhooking the battery is that you'll likely lose your custom tune if you have done so......therefore, you may want to check with your tuner BEFORE you unhook the battery. IF you unhook it, you may want to restore your stock tune first.....then unhook....and re-flash it once you put the battery back in.

Also.....Sta-Bil in the tank.

As for tires...I completely agree about jacks IF you're never going to take it out, even on those occasional nice sunny days in January. It'd be a bitch to use up an hour of precious sunshine, just getting it off jacks!!! Heck, '07, you and I only get about 5 hours of daylight this time of year anyway!!!!!!

bj
 
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