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I'm in the camp of the current run of GT500s most likely being the last ICE version -- future ones will be electric, I believe, depending on the time gap between the current run of GT500s and the next run. And they will outperform (stats) the current ICE version. We can debate the experience of ICE vs electric. I love V8s so you know where I would be in that debate.

On the HP front, I continue to wonder if there is a "usable" limit. I think there will continue to be technological improvements/innovations (whether ICE or electric) that will allow HP to increase even more from current levels and the tech/nannies in the cars to be able to safely put that power to the ground so to speak. But I think from a law, infrastructure/road, culture (cancel?) perspective, I'm concerned we are "running out of road" to use a high HP car. What's the point of manufacturing a 1000HP car if the only place you can use it is on the drag strip? That obviously severely shrinks that possible market.

My Saturday morning stream of consciousness...
 

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2013 Shelby GT500 performance white
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Right now it’s $10k + to change batteries.
charging stations are nice, and water used to be free. Wait till they start charging $ to charge your car. And I am sure the gasoline tax will be put onto the chargers for the road tax. Think about all the revenue generated by the taxes on gasoline that will be lost. They will make it up somewhere. And of course we will be the ones to pay for it.
I feel like we’ve got a long way to go.
 

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#1 Mike!
2019 Shelby GT350
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Right now it’s $10k + to change batteries.
charging stations are nice, and water used to be free. Wait till they start charging $ to charge your car. And I am sure the gasoline tax will be put onto the chargers for the road tax. Think about all the revenue generated by the taxes on gasoline that will be lost. They will make it up somewhere. And of course we will be the ones to pay for it.
I feel like we’ve got a long way to go.
Excellent point, Ron!!! When you peel back the onion, $$$ are in the center core. I'm really getting more skeptical about the feasibility and acceptance of electric cars in the future. Just as you brought up this point about replacement battery costs, and the probable excessive costs of re-charging EV batteries, I fully agree that the hidden and unspoken financial penalties of these EV's will surprise a lot of people in the near future. I've never seen a governmental agency get behind some new project when it didn't mean that they were in for a profitable endeavor at the taxpayer's expense. President Regan was right! Just say'n.
 

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2020 GT500 / 2016 GT350
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Outstanding topic!

Though I love the smell of exhaust and burnt rubber. Electric will be the way of the future. Just look at what Tesla is doing with the roadster and their posted times. It’s out of this world, granted that car will be a super car, it’s just proof of what’s to come.

 

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2011 SVTPP GT500 Convertible, Silver
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Art, I think the future will see parking cafes with people charging their cars.
All 6ft apart wearing 4 Biden masks after they've had 6 untested vaccinations that caused their skin to peel off. :p :ROFLMAO: Can't wait for the future, so far it sounds awesome!
 

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2020 GT500 Oxford White / Fully Loaded
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I had a Tesla Performance 3, it was a nice car however, without gauges, engine noise, it became a bit boring after a while. I agree 100% that whether we like it or not, electric will be the future however, I think it will be a very long time before ICE vehicles are 100% no longer made. Also, I still question how much electric cars will actually help environmentally simply due to the power requirements (takes power to make power). Of course, large vehicles such as construction vehicles and other heavy-duty types may be a while off.

I just hope the day never comes where I cannot drive the Shelby or my wife's Trackhawk as those are two cars I plan on keeping as long as I can. Also, for us who grew up in the ICE age...I doubt any of us would come to have the passion for an electric car no matter how fast it is, it's not always about how fast something is but how it gets to that speed.

My Tesla was fun especially from 0-60 and at lower speeds for darting in/out of traffic however, it still did not have the character that any ICE sports car has for me personally.
 

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I've seen Tesla charging stations. I'm guessing a Tesla owner can plug in at no expense. But are there "charging" stations out there that will work on a different electric vehicle? Do they have standardized plugs? Is there a fee to charge for 30 minutes as an example?

Tom
 

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2020 GT500 Oxford White / Fully Loaded
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I've seen Tesla charging stations. I'm guessing a Tesla owner can plug in at no expense. But are there "charging" stations out there that will work on a different electric vehicle? Do they have standardized plugs? Is there a fee to charge for 30 minutes as an example?

Tom
It depends, some models include charging while others such as the 3 (well, when I bought mine) required a credit-card for payment. I am not 100% sure if the Tesla chargers work with other cars. I did wire in a 240V at home which, was able to charge it relatively quickly. However, fueling up a car is still faster however, the quick chargers have improved quite a bit as 10 minutes can buy you up to 50+ miles in most EVs now. Even so, I think we are a while away before we see a majority driving EVs as compared to ICE vehicles. Also, for people who do not have home access to charging, it will always present a problem unless apartments and other places begin offering charging with parking. Also, any house with more than 2 or 3 cars will see a significant electric bills (mine on average was about $75 worth each month).

...oddly enough, it was exactly the same cost as my previous daily driver so, I did not see any cost savings.
 

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2020 Ford Mustang GT500
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As Chris stated above, some Tesla owners where able to get free lifetime charging on a their specific Tesla, but I think that has now gone away. The cost for charging will depend on where, but there are charging stations out there that are not Tesla. I think they are more universal in the vehicles they .

A couple friends that I have with EV’s are slowly discovering that they are not really saving much money as compared to an ICE vehicle for the cost of fuel (Electric or Fossil) to miles. How much you can save depends on energy costs to your home and the cost to fill at charging stations. There does seem to be some saving in overall maintenance costs.

I don’t own an EV, but have been tempted to pick one up. However, there is still not enough range for me. My daily is GMC Canyon with the small 2.8 Duramax and I can’t complain on the fuel economy. I have a 21 gallon tank and can get at least 550 miles to the tank on the highway before the fuel light comes on.

I still suspect the best bang for buck in refilling an EV at home would be solar storing to a home battery that is then used to recharge the EV. The infrastructure for refueling an EV is growing...but so are the costs.
 

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#1 Mike!
2019 Shelby GT350
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You all make some good points about the electrical infrastructure necessary to support a large, and growing number of EV's in our society. I just think they're putting the cart before the horse with the increasing number of EV's replacing ICE's as standard means of transportation. Even if the government or private industry (most likely) start bulking up to address the future and substantial need for more electricity, getting them to get on board to supply enough electrical power to sustain the EV's is going to be difficult. How will they determine how much more electrical power will be needed? What I see happening is what we seem to do all too frequently in this country. We run head long into some new technology before we think about the support and complexity of a supportive infrastructure to make it work. Instead, we play catch up for years, trying to solve the problems that are created. Maybe I'm just being too pessimistic, but I think we will have some real problems in our future.
 

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2020 Shelby GT500 base + handling pack
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You all make some good points about the electrical infrastructure necessary to support a large, and growing number of EV's in our society. I just think they're putting the cart before the horse with the increasing number of EV's replacing ICE's as standard means of transportation. Even if the government or private industry (most likely) start bulking up to address the future and substantial need for more electricity, getting them to get on board to supply enough electrical power to sustain the EV's is going to be difficult. How will they determine how much more electrical power will be needed? What I see happening is what we seem to do all too frequently in this country. We run head long into some new technology before we think about the support and complexity of a supportive infrastructure to make it work. Instead, we play catch up for years, trying to solve the problems that are created. Maybe I'm just being too pessimistic, but I think we will have some real problems in our future.
There are some efforts in the area of creating a National Electric grid with storage and exchanges between the various regions.
I view these efforts as a good sign that they are at least thinking in the direction of improvement.

The North American Electric Grid as an Exchange Network: An Approach for Evaluating Energy Resource Composition and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Environmental Science & Technology (acs.org)
 

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Maybe a new technology will come along to make the charging much faster.
They should make a battery for each motor, 4 motors, 4 batteries (25% of the current battery size). Each battery can charge independent of the others. Recharge time is then 25% of what it is now. One battery dies out means one motor does not work. You still have 3 batteries and motors.
 

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Hey guys and gals, I thought I’d start this discussion based on what’s going on with the trend of engine technology and the potential of regulations going forward. I feel the current GT500 that we are all loving and experiencing right now may potentially be the last of a breed. We now see Ferrari moving away from naturally aspirated motors into hybrid power technology and others are doing the same. Is it possible the next GT500 could be a hybrid powered beast with over 1,000 hp? I was just curious what others think. We already see the potential of the Mach E and success of how much power these types of engines can produce. I’m sure the next GT500 will be similar. But who knows.
Would love to know peoples thoughts.
Don't know about you guys, but I for one will never buy an electric GT500 even if it has 2000 horsepower. To me, a GT500 is a car begun and refined in the tradition of 1960's and early 1970's American muscle cars. Speaking for myself, an electric or hybrid GT500 is blasphemy. It is bad enough that it no longer has three pedals. To then go to an electric car is way too much for me. Just my opinion.
 
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I have driven a Tesla. Impressive performance. Just for me not the same ethereal experience.
I do think the way the politicians want things to go is all electric or renewable.. Just not very practical in so many ways. Don't really want to get into a political fight here. But, will say: to think that 10pm in the middle of August 100+ degree day in California they buy electricity from Neighboring Nevada Natural Gas electric generation plants. And used to buy from Coal power too until that was shut down. The reservoirs tend to be pumped or at their limit come late July early August depending on that year. Battery technology isn't there to provide electricity all night, yet. And not to mention the % loss of electricity from cradle to grave is over 70%. Natural gas is about 10% loss. I'm not against electric by any means. But, I do think it is short sighted to have Nevada push AB380 getting rid of Natural gas in the state. Can't wait to see how people are going to afford to swap all their natural gas appliances (Heater included) to All electric. Not to mention the increased drying time for their clothes, massive increased cost in heating etc. For some people no big deal. But, for those that try to say they are for the little guy while pushing policies that directly hurt them is a bit over the top hypocritical for me.
If this is offensive... Well, I'm glad in the US we can have different opinions. Or at least the one I grew up in we could. Today? Maybe not so much anymore.
 
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My one concern for electric range is it is not real world close in cold climates. My friend who owns said Tesla had a full charge that said it would go way over 200 miles before recharge needed. He drove to Sacramento from Reno (about 120 miles) and barely made it. Winter kills the range. Perhaps they need to have better real range numbers. ICE vehicles have a around town and hwy miles. Perhaps electric should have a hot cold range. So, buyers can have be fully informed. Sort of like diesel pickup trucks. Don't see why they don't show fuel economy range.
If I decide to buy something that gets 5 mpg then that should be my choice; not, legislation prohibited. IMO...

Yes, electric is going to be faster, awd etc. Eventually fast to charge and cheaper to drive per mile. People will purchase them just for the improvements and efficiency. That is great. How is Oregon going to get goods into the State when they want to ban diesel?
 

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I am not anti-EV, but if they stop manufacturing performance ICE vehicles, my hobby and interests in car racing will either be cancelled or at least on hiatus until they develop a truly long-lasting battery.

I have been on the race track with Tesla vehicles, and they are one-trick ponies. Great acceleration, but no stamina. They peter out after about 10 minutes of hard driving and the brakes become scary (primarily because they rely too much upon regen braking). Because of the charging issue, the driver was only able to get in 2 ten minute sessions that day. The rest of us got in 6 twenty-five minute sessions. Some of the other drivers were very pissed that the Tesla vehicle became a road hazard when the power was reduced by the vehicle's controller...

For me, it seems like we have a long way to go yet. Hybrids will fill the gap.
 
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