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Discussion Starter #1
(I posted this also in the Vendor section at For My Ride.)

I installed the first set of Stainless Steel brake lines with the special coating on them provided by Jerry @ For My Ride.
These come complete with all the necessary brackets . The best part is the clear protective coating that protects the steel braiding from all the road dirt that works itself into the lines causing premature degradation of the actual hoses.The kit sells for $225 + $10 shipping (front and rear included )

Here are some pics of the kit and the install.I also replaced the brake fluid with Motul RBF 600 as it has a much higher wet and dry boiling point than the OEM fluid.
If you plan on driving fast you'll need to be able to stop fast with a solid pedal without the worry of brake fade or that spongy brake feel. This is money well spent IMO.



Complete kit.


Closeup of clear coating.


Used a flarenut wrench on the brake line fittings.


There are right and left brackets and hoses .


Front hose with front strut bracket


Front hoses finished . I used black wire ties to keep the antilock lines along side.


Rear hoses side by side comparison


Rear bracket with antilock line attached


Rear bracket mounted
 

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Them is purdy.
 

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Well done George, how did you keep the fluid from making a mess upon bleeding? Did you use clear plastic tubing? or did you buy a vacuum bleeder tool? I haven't looked at our hi-perf calipers in front...do they have multiple bleeders?

Thanks,

dave
 

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They are very well made brake lines. Got a set from StangSuspension.com about 2 weeks ago and installed very easily. They are available for about $170 if you shop around....
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well done George, how did you keep the fluid from making a mess upon bleeding? Did you use clear plastic tubing? or did you buy a vacuum bleeder tool? I haven't looked at our hi-perf calipers in front...do they have multiple bleeders?

Thanks,

dave
My power bleeder needs an adapter to work on this car so I did it the old fashon way.
Yes there are two bleeders on the front calipers.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ah ha. There are two old-fashioned ways.

1) have the wife/child pump the brakes

2) gravity bleeding

Dave
As long as the hose from the bleeder in submersed in a clean container with the same brake fluid you can actually pump the pedal slowly and when you let up on the pedal no air will be sucked back in.
That's what I did because I was by myself....very easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
They are very well made brake lines. Got a set from StangSuspension.com about 2 weeks ago and installed very easily. They are available for about $170 if you shop around....
Just trying to use the vendors on this site and Jerry at For My Ride has been great with other products such as the Porterfield brake pads.
 

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As long as the hose from the bleeder in submersed in a clean container with the same brake fluid you can actually pump the pedal slowly and when you let up on the pedal no air will be sucked back in.
That's what I did because I was by myself....very easy.
Ah yes, forgot about the third method.

Thanks George.

Dave

P.S. One tip for other readers....this is difficult to explain so I'll try to be thorough...

When you bleed brakes, don't push the pedal all the way to the floor. On a newer car, you likely won't hurt anything...but on a car that's 3+ years old...it will cause trouble. let me explain...

A master cylinder has a "piston" in it. the piston has some rubber o-rings on it. Normally that piston travels in a given "range" of the bore. The bore, over time, becomes rusty in areas in which the o-rings typically don't travel. Normally this is not an issue because the o-rings never see that rust...they are constantly travelling in the "normal" range, which is constantly being cleaned.

Then, you decide to change brakes. You get in the car to bleed the brakes and push the pedal to the floor. You've just pushed the master cylinder piston right through the path of all that rust/corrosion. This tears the o-ring on the master cylinder piston. It may not fail right then...but you've just shortened the life of the master cylinder.

I did tons of brake jobs in the '80s. I can't tell you the number of times a customer came in needing a master cylinder, and when I asked them if they'd had any work done on the car recently they'd say "Well yea, now that you mention it I had my wheel cylinder changed last month" or "I had my brakes bled a few weeks ago". The previous technician unknowingly shortened the life of the master cylinder.

So, the correct method is to pump only in the normal range of pedal travel. This takes longer, but you don't tear up the o-rings.

Again, on a new car like ours there will be no rust...so this is not an issue. just think about this on your older vehicles.

Dave
 

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Thanks for the detailed info Dave.:)
 

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As long as the hose from the bleeder in submersed in a clean container with the same brake fluid you can actually pump the pedal slowly and when you let up on the pedal no air will be sucked back in.
That's what I did because I was by myself....very easy.
I used to have a homemade bleeder contraption made from surgical tubing and a mayonnaise jar. Worked great...until I dropped it.
 

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I used to have a homemade bleeder contraption made from surgical tubing and a mayonnaise jar. Worked great...until I dropped it.
 

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And I modified my supercharger with a drinking straw, bubble gum wrapper and some bailing wire. I got another 50 hp! :D
 

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