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I'm doing research on my next mod I'll be doing in the next few weeks. I'm going to upgrade the stock 2010 heat exchanger, install the Roush intercooler tank and replace the pump (might as well while I have the bumper cover off). I was set on either the C & R exchanger or the Shelby one (both C & R from what I've read). Question is, are the HE fans really necessary on these cars? I had the twin 11" Spal fan upgrade on my 2.9 Whipple 2012 GT. Seemed to work ok, until I experimented one day. I installed a switch inside for the fans to control them. One day in the spring (75* ambient) I decided to turn them off to see the difference in IAT2's. Really only saw them rise about 5* with the fans off. Didn't see any difference while cruising. With the fans on or off at a stop, the IAT2's would go up dramatically until the throttle body opened when I accelerated (which is normal). Just wondering what your experience is with HE and fans before I order one. I did install the 13/14 GT500 radiator cooling fan last month which is supposed to move a lot more air than the 07-12 fans, I would think that would help some.
 

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Wow! Great read. Thanks for the article. I've had the C & R/Shelby piece on for years with no issues. I went this direction for track days that were going to be in the heat of summer. I did 40 min sessions at Laguna Seca with no issues, but now I wonder how much the dual Spal fans have actually helped. I would say though, based on the article and as asked, if/when my '08 fan dies I would definitely replace it with the 13/14 piece.
 

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I wonder how much the fans help push hot air through the extractors in the engine bay? Therefore helping the intake air temps, piping, and upper intercooler their testing bypasses...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
High IAT2s when stopped has more to do with hot underhood air getting sucked into the intake and not a reflection of intercooler performance.
Agreed, that's why I'm not really looking at IAT's while stopped.
 

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Department of Boost has a video of anemometer readings with a fanned heat exchanger on their facebook page. I'm left pretty underwhelmed after seeing just how much air the fans can pull. Maybe worthwhile if you want to cool down the intercooler coolant in the pits. I'd pick mass of the core over fan options. Dual fans add at least a couple hundred $ to heat exchangers depending on fan size and number of relays.
 

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At the track the Fans are very helpful with Air Flow as being stuck behind back markers on the Road Course can impede airflow to the I/C.


The amount of HEAT 🔥 these Cars produce is just stupid, on the Track (R/C) the heat is almost prohibitive, so anything you can do to dissipate heat makes complete sense.

That said, if you are planning to Drag Race the car you may not want the extra weight of the Larger I/C and additional Coolant. Performance Mods are all about what you want to do with the Car.
 

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Department of Boost has a video of anemometer readings with a fanned heat exchanger on their facebook page. I'm left pretty underwhelmed after seeing just how much air the fans can pull. Maybe worthwhile if you want to cool down the intercooler coolant in the pits. I'd pick mass of the core over fan options. Dual fans add at least a couple hundred $ to heat exchangers depending on fan size and number of relays.
Department of Boost has a video of anemometer readings with a fanned heat exchanger on their facebook page. I'm left pretty underwhelmed after seeing just how much air the fans can pull. Maybe worthwhile if you want to cool down the intercooler coolant in the pits. I'd pick mass of the core over fan options. Dual fans add at least a couple hundred $ to heat exchangers depending on fan size and number of relays.
That’s along the lines that I’m thinking. I had the fans on my Whipple 2012 GT and would turn them on and off to experiment. Didn’t see any difference while normal cruising.
This car will likely only see a few dragstrip runs a year, so I’m more interested in HE surface area.
 

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Didn’t see any difference while normal cruising.
You have airflow through the HE when cruising. The same could be said for your radiator fan... I don’t see any temp drop at highway speeds therefore my radiator fan is worthless. The fans are for when airflow is low to non-existent.
 

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Imho, the fans just blow the hot air around the bay. The hot air is still there regardless.
With or without, your choice. Most everyone gets fans though.
 

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Imho, the fans just blow the hot air around the bay. The hot air is still there regardless.
With or without, your choice. Most everyone gets fans though.
You can see from JTB’s post above that the fans suck air through the lower grille and across the HE. This is ambient air from in front of the car.
 

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You can see from JTB’s post above that the fans suck air through the lower grille and across the HE. This is ambient air from in front of the car.
I know what they do. I have them.
I many fans. Fans of great multitudes. They just blow around the same hot air all over the bay. They blow directly into the radiator and then the radiator fans blow that air into the bay that never escapes the bay.
Then in turn we have things called heat soak. Something unfortunately I am very experienced with.

what they can help with though is cooling the HE with the hood open pretty decently between runs at the track. Once the hood is shut, it’s all moot as it’s all backwash.
Hence why everyone still has heatsoak issues.
 

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You have airflow through the HE when cruising. The same could be said for your radiator fan... I don’t see any temp drop at highway speeds therefore my radiator fan is worthless. The fans are for when airflow is low to non-existent.
I agree but even at slow speeds I would turn the fans off and only see a 5* rise in IAT. That was with the Whipple HE and the 13/14 GT500 radiator fan.
 

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At low load when the by-pass valve is open, your intercooler isn't all that relevant anyway. Air is circulating through the intercooler and up through the by-pass valve, and re-circulating again. You're just not going to notice much cool down through the intercooler in that scenario. I do think you need to be circulating coolant through the intercooler system. Coolant does need to circulate through the HE, so you need a functioning pump and no air pocket in the system.

Once you get over 15 mph, airflow through the HE core is surpassing what the fans can suck through the core. Unless the by-pass is closed (WOT), I think monitoring/logging IAT2s is pretty much a waste of time.

Circulating coolant through the intercooler brick, absent any airflow (engine off), isn't going to do a great deal to cool down the intake and the supercharger. I just don't think fans are quite the benefit they're made out to be.

The video I referred to earlier is not working, but it's worth a view when it is available. I am going the big core, no fan route. I'll post up by observations once we get into the heat of summer. Without fans, the HE can be placed closer to the condenser to get the benefit of some airflow using the radiator fan.
 

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At low load when the by-pass valve is open, your intercooler isn't all that relevant anyway. Air is circulating through the intercooler and up through the by-pass valve, and re-circulating again. You're just not going to notice much cool down through the intercooler in that scenario. I do think you need to be circulating coolant through the intercooler system. Coolant does need to circulate through the HE, so you need a functioning pump and no air pocket in the system.

Once you get over 15 mph, airflow through the HE core is surpassing what the fans can suck through the core. Unless the by-pass is closed (WOT), I think monitoring/logging IAT2s is pretty much a waste of time.

Circulating coolant through the intercooler brick, absent any airflow (engine off), isn't going to do a great deal to cool down the intake and the supercharger. I just don't think fans are quite the benefit they're made out to be.

The video I referred to earlier is not working, but it's worth a view when it is available. I am going the big core, no fan route. I'll post up by observations once we get into the heat of summer. Without fans, the HE can be placed closer to the condenser to get the benefit of some airflow using the radiator fan.
I agree with you 100%! I think the core is of more importance than the HE. I have talked to people that have tried every HE out there chasing their tail and same results found within a couple degrees maybe.
Really, the issue more than anything is trapped underhood heat IMHO, then the core.
If you want to spin that blower hard and have long tubes, its just gonna be hot as hell. Until you can evacuate heat, we are just pissing in the wind.
My goal for this year was to try and get some better hood venting and some grille ducts and tubing to try and work on underhood temp evacuation before spending big money. High temp ceramic on the long tubes may come at some point too.
 

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So what I'm getting out of this is we need fans in our hood :ROFLMAO:
Run with no hood and I am sure you will see IAT issues pretty much disappear. This is not realistic, so people try to combat this issue with throwing money where the manufacturers tell them too without thinking overly logical about the issue as a whole .
 
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