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Discussion Starter #1
I have a well cared for, no previous issues, 2016 GT350 track pack with 1,400 miles, debating whether to trade toward's a friend's 2018 1,100 mile well cared for GT350R. He's waiting on a new GT500, therefore unloading the R. For those who may have had both, is the difference worth it? I won't be tracking it so the track times don't mean anything to me.
 

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#1 Mike!
2019 Shelby GT350
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I have a 2019 GT350. I chose not to get the R version, as it was more expensive and had equipment that I really didn't foresee that I would use and appreciate. The R lacks a back seat, very expensive to replace carbon fiber wheels, and some other minor tweaks in the suspension that you probably would never notice. I'm sure the R model is a nice car; however, the cost of it didn't justify ordering one.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm thinking the same. From a "fun to drive standpoint", is there really much difference?
 

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If you're not going to track it, keep yours or get a 2020 GT350, it has the R's engine now and a few components from the new GT500.

The R's enhancements are Track centric.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Not really looking to get rid of my '16. Love the car, but when I heard about the R becoming available, it got me thinking. Just don't know that I'd see much difference during my infrequent driving.
 

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#1 Mike!
2019 Shelby GT350
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I'm thinking the same. From a "fun to drive standpoint", is there really much difference?
The standard GT350 I have is a blast to drive. Even more fun than my previous 2013 GT500! There is some clarification on the engines. The R engine and standard engine have been internally the same in both models since 2015, according to Ford Performance. In 2019 FMC did change the 5.2 GT350 block to be identical to the same specifications used in the new 2020 GT500, thus making it stronger. There are also some minor internal changes in the 2019 GT350 motor that are shared by both the GT500, the standard, and R model. So the 2019 standard and R models use exactly the same engine. As suggested, if you're set on a newer model than your 2016, I'd advise looking for a 2019 GT350 or order a 2020 GT350. Mind you, there are no changes in the 2020 other than a different body color being available. Now would be a great time to land a 2019 as they are at their MY end. But you stated you're happy with your 2016, so no real, sensible reason to get your friend's R model.
 

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The standard GT350 I have is a blast to drive. Even more fun than my previous 2013 GT500! There is some clarification on the engines. The R engine and standard engine have been internally the same in both models since 2015, according to Ford Performance. In 2019 FMC did change the 5.2 GT350 block to be identical to the same specifications used in the new 2020 GT500, thus making it stronger. There are also some minor internal changes in the 2019 GT350 motor that are shared by both the GT500, the standard, and R model. So the 2019 standard and R models use exactly the same engine. As suggested, if you're set on a newer model than your 2016, I'd advise looking for a 2019 GT350 or order a 2020 GT350. Mind you, there are no changes in the 2020 other than a different body color being available. Now would be a great time to land a 2019 as they are at their MY end. But you stated you're happy with your 2016, so no real, sensible reason to get your friend's R model.
Don't think there were any changes to the engine in 2019, they occurred for 2020.
Here's a synopsis of the changes for 2019 Model Year.

 

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Discussion Starter #10
I just took it for a short drive on the street and noticed very little, if any difference. I suspect the lighter weight and lack of a resonator (?) would only be noticeable on the track. For the $$ difference, my 2016 looks pretty good!
 

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2019 GT350R FPB
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I was at this cross roads. I sold my 2013 GT500 in preparation for a 2020 GT500 I ordered. I had some finance changes that forced me to re-prioritize the purchase and landed on getting a GT350 instead.

I had a choice at that point. I was going to get a 2019 or later and wanted a specific color combo. I looked at many R's and although one would be cool, I determined it just wasn't needed. I didn't want the hassle of the CF rims or the lower and stiffer suspension. I did welcome the rear seat delete, that's cool. But never had any plans of tracking the car, just fun weekend back road blasts and corners.

2019 is when the V2 Voodoo was released and the block is the same casting they use for the GT500. This means the block has the extra reinforcement webbing as well as the extra long head bolts. Ford also stopped using different motor components between the R and standard GT350 in 2019 thus all GT350/R's have the exact same engine. This includes the low leak solenoids for the VVT system.

In the end, I ended up ordering a 2020 GT350 spec'd my way. I could've settle for a couple 2019's that were available that were missing a desired option or maybe the stripe color was a second choice. I probably could've scoop up a 2019 R for a price not too far off from a new 2020 but opted out because of what I stated above.

Now if something happens to my order and I won't get delivery this year. I'll go 12 miles down the road and buy an R that has the correct color combo I want that's been sitting at the dealer for a few months. If it gets to that, by then, the dealer will be ready to make a deal which could offset the cost of different rims for the R since I wouldn't be able to enjoy it on public roads without constantly worrying if I just jacked up a rim on that last shitty road surface.
 

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I just took it for a short drive on the street and noticed very little, if any difference. I suspect the lighter weight and lack of a resonator (?) would only be noticeable on the track. For the $$ difference, my 2016 looks pretty good!
Guess that answers your initial question ..... wish everything was this easy to solve !! LOL
 

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In 2019 FMC did change the 5.2 GT350 block to be identical to the same specifications used in the new 2020 GT500, thus making it stronger. There are also some minor internal changes in the 2019 GT350 motor that are shared by both the GT500, the standard, and R model. So the 2019 standard and R models use exactly the same engine.
Don't think there were any changes to the engine in 2019, they occurred for 2020.
Here's a synopsis of the changes for 2019 Model Year.
Hey Mike and JTB,

I've been searching the internet for this info and don't see this mentioned anywhere. There seems to be some difference of opinion as to whether the 2019 is the same block as the 2020 GT500.

Snce I bought a 2019 GT350R and I'd really like to know the answer to this.

Thanks guys,

Jim
 

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#1 Mike!
2019 Shelby GT350
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Jim, Call Ford Performance and hit the #1 choice to speak with one of the technical representatives. 800-367-3788. They can answer all your questions and will give you the accurate information you're seeking about your car. The GT350 forums are confusing as everyone seems to have a different source.
 

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2012 SVTPP with a heavy dose of 2013 components
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I'm sure the longer bolt holes are an extra machining process. If the block has gotten additional webbing, it's likely a change in the casting. They likely limited the new blocks to the R models until the old stash of blocks were used up in the regular GT350s. Just when that point occurred, or if there are distinguishable casting marks to identify it as one or thte other is anyone's guess. I'd contact Ford Performance and see if anyone can give you a definitive answer.

Here's the description of the current 5.2 block in FP web site, which highlights some of the upgrades. M-6010-M52B

  • Upgraded version of previous Ford Performance M-6010-M52 and M-6010-M52A 5.2L Coyote Aluminum Cylinder Blocks
  • Features higher flow oil squirters to provide added piston cooling
  • Rod bolt path is clearance machined in crancase of block
  • Improved high-performance casting of the Coyote block with improvements to support higher horsepower engine builds
  • Utliizes Longer (187mm) 12 mm cylinder head bolts to provide greater clamping force (requires longer Head Bolt Kit - M-6067-M501280, or M-6067-M52B head changing kit)
  • Improved crankcase windage
  • 94.0 mm bore
  • Water jacket below cylinder bore has been updated to add more material for strength
  • The intake side of the bore at the deck surface includes a cast-in brace to improve strength of the cylinder wall and head gasket sealing
  • Block features plasma transferred wire arc spray weld liner coating
  • Liner coating provides improved durability and heat transfer, reduced friction, and a weight savings compared to previous 5.0L Mustang GT aluminum blocks
  • Cylinder liner coating does not require unique piston rings or piston material
  • Cylinder bores are finish-honed and ready to assemble
  • All block features are finish-machined including head deck and crank bore
  • Cross-bolted nodular iron main bearing caps
  • Uses 12 mm cylinder head bolts
  • Block has provisions for piston oil squirters
  • Includes plugs and dowels, and oil squirters
 

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Jim, Call Ford Performance and hit the #1 choice to speak with one of the technical representatives. 800-367-3788. They can answer all your questions and will give you the accurate information you're seeking about your car. The GT350 forums are confusing as everyone seems to have a different source.
Mike, that is too funny, I was just going to do that. I have spoken with them 3 times this week. I was going to install the zl1 Addons front rock guards and was looking at the spot where the rocks accumulate and though, I bet this is like this for a reason, and it sure was. They told me they left that opening by deisgn.

thanks,

Jim
 

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#1 Mike!
2019 Shelby GT350
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Did they confirm to you that the 2019 5.2 liter engine block is the same as the 5.2 engine block for the 2020 GT500? That's what they told me earlier this week. They explained it was done to reduce having to create two differently designed engine blocks for the 350 and 500. The 350 obviously benefited from that decision as they made the block stronger for the 500 to withstand the additional stress of the supercharger.
 

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So this is really getting difficult, representative1 at FP says no the 500 has cross plane crank and 350 has flat plane crank. I wanted to say well DUH but I didn't. I said no, I'm just trying to understand if they use the same block, I understand the 500 crank is different and it is supercharged but the actual block and things they did to strengthen it. He said I need to send you to someone else.

Number 2 representative says sure why would they be the same, the 18 and 19 350 use the same block so why wouldn't they take use the 500 block. I said the 500 block wasn't really released in 18, so how could it be. He said the 18 and 19 are identical. I said ok, but can you confirm that, so now he's going to talk to the engineers and email be an answer.

Wow, that was exhausting.

Stay tuned.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If he emails you back, please ask him if the 18 and 19 350 block is any different than the 15-17 block.
 

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I'm guessing there's a difference somewhere in that chain. If you note what I posted above, the part number indicates the block is on it's third revision with the A and B suffix.
 
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