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2021 GT500
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My 2011 is my 3rd Super Duty, and this is what I have learned from them and what would my top options would be if I bought a newer one

  • F350 SRW with the increased 11,500 GVWR rating option
  • Long bed = bigger fuel tank, but reduction in overall towing capacity
  • 3.55's are a well balanced rear end gear
  • Get a rear e-locker over a LSD
  • Lariat Ultimate package has just about all the bells in whistles one could want
  • 360 camera is a great tool for parking, solo trailer hoo up, drive throughs
  • Go with an after market hitch (B&W)
  • Camper package for the over load springs and rear sway bar
  • I have only owned the diesel (7.3, 6.0, 6.7), but the new 7.3 gasser would make me think twice with the amount of crap these newer diesels have to deal with.
 

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2021 GT500-2.85 griptech pulley/long tube headers/JLT Intake/1050x Injectors
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i don’t know much about ford trucks either Russell lol. I own 4 F-250’s, an F-350 and an F-450. Unless you get a dually a 350 has no benefit over the 250 other than the fuel capacity. Throw a set of airbags on a 250 and it’s a better ride with the same towing capacity as a SRW 350. Coming from an f-150, a long bed super duty will be a handful to drive and park
 

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2022 DMG CFTP
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If you’re going diesel, skip the 250 and go 350 SRW. 350 you get a higher GVWR and therefore higher payload. Big difference between 250 and 350 when it comes to GVWR and payload.

I have a F350 Lariat Ultimate with the 7.3 gasser and have 3,900 lbs payload. I had a 2021 Ram 2500 diesel Mega Cab and payload was 1,800 lbs. Weight of the diesel will eat up a lot of the available payload on a 2500 as it has a lower GVWR than a 350. GVWR - weight of your truck with fuel and passengers and gear = available payload capacity i.e. tongue weight.
 

· Moderator/Admin Dude!
2020 CFTP Red! 2011 Kona Blue
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
No advice to offer Tim, but looking forward to seeing your new rig. I believe the advice everyone has given is very good though.

Happy shopping, hope you get a deal. I've never even seen a F350 Here, few F250's

If you don't mine me asking how much these F350's going for these days. Off topic, sorry

I am off to the track in a hour. ( Rented Clark speedway for the day) I won't have video or pictures this time, I'll be alone.

I have a question about your rear camera in the video you posted on the 909hp hellcat thread. I posted the question there. I also asked other questions.

Anyway got to get ready.
Wide variations on prices. Here is the configurator:
If you’re going diesel, skip the 250 and go 350 SRW. 350 you get a higher GVWR and therefore higher payload. Big difference between 250 and 350 when it comes to GVWR and payload.
Yes, I remember our chat awhile back and heeding your advice! F350 it is!
 

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2010 Shelby GT500 Kona Blue/Silver stripes
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I have a 2019 KR F350 LB with the 5th Wheel prep. I wanted the bigger fuel tank. Yes, its longer in parking spaces but worth it.
I put a below the rail tool box in, then my B&W 5th wheel hitch and a Backflip bed cover. I can open up the bed cover and hook up the 5th wheel.

No need for air bags, it tows my 38' toy hauler RV with no sag.

I had a 2011 F250 Lariat SB previously and I wished I had a bigger bed and fuel tank.

View attachment 261600
Have you ever measured your bumper height before and after hooking up your trailer? You’re sagging, but you may not notice it. Oncoming traffic at night would. I’ve even measured before and after hooking up my little 17’ Jayco TT, and that’s a lot less box weight than your trailer. I think you’ll find your bumper drops an inch or two…..or more depending on how heavy you load the trailer up front.
 

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You will be very happy with the F350 SRW. I have a 2021 Limited. Long bed gets you the bigger fuel tank(48 gallon). I love the LED headlights as we drive a lot at night. Someday when we order again I would omit the sunroof as we rarely open it in the summer as it’s too hot. I like the auto deployable running boards. I’m a huge fan of adaptive cruise, tailgate step and all the cameras.
 

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'22 HE CFTP + TP | ATL GA, USA
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Great thread, and awesome machine.

Happy for you, Tim! Looking forward to pictures and videos when the time comes.

I have no practical towing experience nor hands-on mechanical ability.
I have grad degrees in Mechanical Eng and mathematics, so my input is from that angle --take it with a grain of salt.

Of note:
  • The Tremor package isn't available on Limited
  • If you need off-roading capabilities, what you mechanically get for the cost of the Tremor package is tremendous value, and Tremor reviews are overall positive
  • If you are going with the 6.7 diesel, its High-Output sibling is only a $2K for a significant mechanical (and, of course, power) upgrade: water-cooled turbo housing, stainless manifolds, increased oil capacity -- new for MY2023. There will be maintenance considerations.
  • Choose the right alternator setup from factory (dual is < $150 upgrade, see excerpt below)
  • Base bed length is 6-3/4', extended is 8' (our crew cab F150s are 5-5')

When the current consumption is high or the battery is discharged the PCM raises engine speed to increase generator output.
In dual generator systems, the PCM keeps the secondary generator in a standby state where it does not generate current unless the primary generator is generating full power and more current is needed to support the vehicle loads. The PCM monitors the output of the primary generator and adjusts the control setpoint of the secondary generator to cause it to provide additional current when needed. -- Dual Extra Heavy Duty Alternator - Page 2 - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums (ford-trucks.com)
 

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(our crew cab F150s are 5-5')
Splitting hairs by fractions of an inch, but here's the "official":

  • Short bed: The smallest of the three, the 5.5-foot short bed measures 67.1 inches long by 50.6 inches wide and gives drivers 52.8 cubic feet of cargo space.
  • Regular bed: For a bit more room, the 6.5-foot regular bed provides drivers with a space that’s 78.9 inches long by 50.6 inches wide with 62.3 cubic feet of cargo capacity.

I love having the 6.5-foot bed on my Crew Cab 150.
 

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I have a 2019 KR F350 LB with the 5th Wheel prep. I wanted the bigger fuel tank. Yes, its longer in parking spaces but worth it.
I put a below the rail tool box in, then my B&W 5th wheel hitch and a Backflip bed cover. I can open up the bed cover and hook up the 5th wheel.

No need for air bags, it tows my 38' toy hauler RV with no sag.

I had a 2011 F250 Lariat SB previously and I wished I had a bigger bed and fuel tank.
I forgot about the 8' bed larger fuel tank. It is great at 47gal, really reduces the need for an in bed aux. tank. I get around 9-10mpg with my rig at 70ish, so can go 4-5hrs driving - 300+ mi before needing to look for fuel, and still have a decent reserve.
 

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You will be very happy with the F350 SRW. I have a 2021 Limited. Long bed gets you the bigger fuel tank(48 gallon). I love the LED headlights as we drive a lot at night. Someday when we order again I would omit the sunroof as we rarely open it in the summer as it’s too hot. I like the auto deployable running boards. I’m a huge fan of adaptive cruise, tailgate step and all the cameras.
I agree with your omit the sunroof comment, but I just remembered something that I didn't mention in my earlier post where I said I didn't like the 2" lower headliner. The other problem I had was my sunroof leaked, and what I found out when the Kodiak Ford dealership sent it for repair at a local body shop was interesting. The body shop had previously figured out the trick to getting sunroofs sealed properly, and in my truck the fix involved them knowing the key locations to add sealant when they reinstalled the sunroof. I doubt this would be a big issue for Tim except for the occasional heavy rain, and by now, I would hope that Ford would have fixed the weak link in their sunroofs.

The positive about the sunroof is the rare times when I've opened it while cruising around. The extra mountain fresh air with the smells of ponderosa pine trees is wonderful. The sunroof also lets the driver and passenger look up at adjacent mountain slopes for game animals or just the scenery. So, it's not all bad having a sunroof. Oh, I can't wear my cowboy hat while driving either. :cry::LOL:
 

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I forgot about the 8' bed larger fuel tank. It is great at 47gal, really reduces the need for an in bed aux. tank. I get around 9-10mpg with my rig at 70ish, so can go 4-5hrs driving - 300+ mi before needing to look for fuel, and still have a decent reserve.
What year year is your truck? I get around 10mpg while towing my car hauler trailer. Not towing, I get 14-16 running 70ish. Right now on winter blend in mixed city/freeway driving I average 13.5mpg. Tim would like that from everything I've heard from guys in the latest gen SD diesels is they are getting 2-4mpg better thanks to higher engine output and the 10 speed tranny. My 2014 has 400/800 for hp and torque, the 2022/23 is 475/1050. Amazing numbers which is why I see no need for the HO. Heck, my lowly numbers tow everything I've hooked up to with ease. Non-towing range for mine is over 500 miles.
 

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'22 HE CFTP + TP | ATL GA, USA
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What year year is your truck? I get around 10mpg while towing my car hauler trailer. Not towing, I get 14-16 running 70ish. Right now on winter blend in mixed city/freeway driving I average 13.5mpg. Tim would like that from everything I've heard from guys in the latest gen SD diesels is they are getting 2-4mpg better thanks to higher engine output and the 10 speed tranny. My 2014 has 400/800 for hp and torque, the 2022/23 is 475/1050. Amazing numbers which is why I see no need for the HO. Heck, my lowly numbers tow everything I've hooked up to with ease. Non-towing range for mine is over 500 miles.
If going the diesel route...

A possibly valid reason to spend a little extra going above towing capacity range is machine longevity --particularly what one mechanically (more than output) gets for those $2K.
Heck, we would gladly pay $10K for painted stripes.
Base 6.7 and HO 6.7 will comfortably tow the exact same load within range, but the HO will do so at lower mechanical effort.
Depending on engine design / specifics (haven't gotten to that in detail yet), it could also happen at lower tow average fuel consumption.
The HO is new for MY23... we have to wait for real-world feedback / reviews --there is that.

BUT, if not looking to keep it for long, nor eyeballing potential resale value (assuming the HO performs as expected in real-world tests), then there could be much better use for those $2K.

The F350 is a mechanical beast in base form.
F350 SRW is the sweetest mechanical spot in many regards --starting with parking space / ride comfort without chassis strength compromises.
With 2 alternators and a HO, it could tow right and left without overstressing internals, be it the moon or my chihuahuas (exaggerating to make a point).

Whichever route Tim goes, he will be rocking :) and some of us will happily enjoy vicariously.
 

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If going the diesel route...

A possibly valid reason to spend a little extra going above towing capacity range is machine longevity --particularly what one mechanically (more than output) gets for those $2K.
Heck, we would gladly pay $10K for painted stripes.
Base 6.7 and HO 6.7 will comfortably tow the exact same load within range, but the HO will do so at lower mechanical effort.
Depending on engine design / specifics (haven't gotten to that in detail yet), it could also happen at lower tow average fuel consumption.
The HO is new for MY23... we have to wait for real-world feedback / reviews --there is that.

BUT, if not looking to keep it for long, nor eyeballing potential resale value (assuming the HO performs as expected in real-world tests), then there could be much better use for those $2K.

The F350 is a mechanical beast in base form.
F350 SRW is the sweetest mechanical spot in many regards --starting with parking space / ride comfort without chassis strength compromises.
With 2 alternators and a HO, it could tow right and left without overstressing internals, be it the moon or my chihuahuas (exaggerating to make a point).

Whichever route Tim goes, he will be rocking :) and some of us will happily enjoy vicariously.
I would agree with your thoughts if the base 6.7L was being pushed to it’s limits, but I would say the vast majority of owners barely come close to tapping the existing grunt force available. Most 6.7L’s are yawning while being driven. So mechanically there is no approach to stress limits. Plus, many owners already see the 6.7L lasting a long time. Given this, I just don’t think the addition of 25hp and 150lbft will make a longevity or even noticeable fuel economy difference since the majority of driving is done while the 475/1050 is drinking a margarita. And, this doesn’t even address that the new HO additions are yet untested by the masses, which admittedly you did mention. First year of the change, no thank you. Frankly, I have read about many more 6.7L failures due to operator error (putting DEF in the fuel for example) than outright failures, and I‘ve also read about more failures of the 6speed tranny than the engine. I don’t know how bullet proof the 10 speed tranny is nor what it can handle in torque numbers. Will 1200 cause more failures? No clue, but it won’t cause less.

As you can see I disagree, but that’s ok. Hopefully both platforms will perform great for a long time. I just don’t see $2k worth the return for most owners, and Tim would operate it like most people. Part of me believes that Ford is hoping this HO will win the power bragging rights, which in turn may sell more trucks.
 

· Moderator/Admin Dude!
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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Is this strictly for towing and truck stuff or do you intend to daily drive it? Is it something you plan on keeping long term or flipping in a few years? That would greatly influence my choice of options
I plan to keep the truck for a long time. As for driving… I don’t daily drive anything as I typically only drive to work once every other week. The truck will be driven around town, but I have Mustangs that will share that duty. I am going with the 350 to be a tow beast.

Just ordered the following… I can change stuff up until it gets scheduled:

Font Parallel Number Document Screenshot
 

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I would agree with your thoughts if the base 6.7L was being pushed to it’s limits, but I would say the vast majority of owners barely come close to tapping the existing grunt force available. Most 6.7L’s are yawning while being driven. So mechanically there is no approach to stress limits. Plus, many owners already see the 6.7L lasting a long time. Given this, I just don’t think the addition of 25hp and 150lbft will make a longevity or even noticeable fuel economy difference since the majority of driving is done while the 475/1050 is drinking a margarita. And, this doesn’t even address that the new HO additions are yet untested by the masses, which admittedly you did mention. First year of the change, no thank you. Frankly, I have read about many more 6.7L failures due to operator error (putting DEF in the fuel for example) than outright failures, and I‘ve also read about more failures of the 6speed tranny than the engine. I don’t know how bullet proof the 10 speed tranny is nor what it can handle in torque numbers. Will 1200 cause more failures? No clue, but it won’t cause less.

As you can see I disagree, but that’s ok. Hopefully both platforms will perform great for a long time. I just don’t see $2k worth the return for most owners, and Tim would operate it like most people. Part of me believes that Ford is hoping this HO will win the power bragging rights, which in turn may sell more trucks.
Let's pull up the towing guide: Ford Towing Guide PDF

Font Rectangle Parallel Pattern Number



In many, not all, applications, the HO does not gain you any towing capacity (I'm not going to get into payloads, tongue weight, GVWR, etc). In the specific example of Tim's Crew Cab 8' (176" WB) and 3.31 gear, the jump from 6.7 (22,900) to 6.7HO (23,700) is only 800 lbs. That's roughly 80 lbs of tongue weight when factored at 10%. Peanuts!

Yes, while the HO will tow the same weight with less stress on the system, I think when talked about in percentages, it's nearly negligible. Especially when the overall weight won't be at max, nor will it be used on a daily basis.

Now, if one is towing near max weight EVERY DAY (construction, excavation, etc) then the HO is probably going to get the tip of the hat.
 

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Looks like a good truck order.

Would still recommend getting the supplemental heater option. It’s an electric heater installed that “warms” the air until coolant temps get up there. Most who monitor extra parameters (like I do on a mounted tablet running Torque Pro), notice heat getting better once the coolant exceeds around 115*. Heated seats and heated steering wheel help the comfort level too. My truck seats are the most comfortable of any current or past vehicle I’ve had.
 

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I would agree with your thoughts if the base 6.7L was being pushed to it’s limits, but I would say the vast majority of owners barely come close to tapping the existing grunt force available. Most 6.7L’s are yawning while being driven. So mechanically there is no approach to stress limits. Plus, many owners already see the 6.7L lasting a long time. Given this, I just don’t think the addition of 25hp and 150lbft will make a longevity or even noticeable fuel economy difference since the majority of driving is done while the 475/1050 is drinking a margarita. And, this doesn’t even address that the new HO additions are yet untested by the masses, which admittedly you did mention. First year of the change, no thank you. Frankly, I have read about many more 6.7L failures due to operator error (putting DEF in the fuel for example) than outright failures, and I‘ve also read about more failures of the 6speed tranny than the engine. I don’t know how bullet proof the 10 speed tranny is nor what it can handle in torque numbers. Will 1200 cause more failures? No clue, but it won’t cause less.

As you can see I disagree, but that’s ok. Hopefully both platforms will perform great for a long time. I just don’t see $2k worth the return for most owners, and Tim would operate it like most people. Part of me believes that Ford is hoping this HO will win the power bragging rights, which in turn may sell more trucks.
I think it's great that you do, and provide your feedback... I keep learning from everything you share (so keep posting, please and thank you) --I am at zero towing experience compared to average Joe, much less you, Kodiak.

You are correct RE: when pushing it towards limits. Also, when breaking inertial state in either direction: getting movement and relinquishing it (if you do break with engine). Those are the scenarios where max rating numbers come in handy. Obviously, not representative of real-life duty: we could quickly tax an engine at average towing load, purposely breaking inertia repeatedly while driving on a perfectly flat surface.

And, absolutely yes, if the HO were tried and tested...
On paper, what one mechanically gets (transmission upgrades, I am now wondering?) for those $2K is plenty and hard to retrofit.
 

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Looks like a good truck order.

Would still recommend getting the supplemental heater option. It’s an electric heater installed that “warms” the air until coolant temps get up there. Most who monitor extra parameters (like I do on a mounted tablet running Torque Pro), notice heat getting better once the coolant exceeds around 115*. Heated seats and heated steering wheel help the comfort level too. My truck seats are the most comfortable of any current or past vehicle I’ve had.
Tim's Texas is quite different than your Idaho or my Indiana. :) "Cold?" "Heater?" He'll likely burn up the ventilated seats though combating Swamp Butt. :)
 
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