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First line of the article..."The manual transmission's long, harrowing demise continued in 2019." :cry:

Electric cars outsold the manual transmission for the first time in 2019
 

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Coming up on 2 years since we bought our son his Focus ST. He told me the other day "Dad, I'm SO glad you guys bought me a manual. Thanks!"
 

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Moderator/Admin Dude!
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Coming up on 2 years since we bought our son his Focus ST. He told me the other day "Dad, I'm SO glad you guys bought me a manual. Thanks!"
Very cool Jon.

I insisted my sons both got manuals for their first cars. It took awhile to perfect their skills, but they both love them now.

I have always been a big manual transmission fan. I’ve had manual Mustangs since my very first car decades ago. Now with a DCT paddle-shifter in the garage, I am a big fan of the new tech!
 

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#1 Mike!
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I know we've beaten this subject to death. My two grandkids will learn to drive a six speed manual on my 2010 Fusion; like it or not! Last year, Greg, (blackcad55) suggested that we should first teach our kids on an automatic so they could concentrate on steering, braking, and speed control. Once they are comfortable with those skills, move on to a manual. Makes good sense to me and that's what I'll do. I want them to, at least, experience the art of shifting a manual equipped car and after that, they can make a decision as to what transmission they want to have (If there is any choice by then!). I think the general population looks at cars more and more as just transportation from A to B and they want the least amount of interaction available to them. It's a sad realization for me, but I think it's accurate.
 

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My first car was a 1967 Mustang convertible with a 3-speed manual. High school kid and my Dad let me drive it some as we were rebuilding it. He basically said - learn to drive a stick. If you want to go to a friend's house, etc., figure it out. And I did. No other choice.
 

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I know we've beaten this subject to death. My two grandkids will learn to drive a six speed manual on my 2010 Fusion; like it or not! Last year, Greg, (blackcad55) suggested that we should first teach our kids on an automatic so they could concentrate on steering, braking, and speed control. Once they are comfortable with those skills, move on to a manual. Makes good sense to me and that's what I'll do. I want them to, at least, experience the art of shifting a manual equipped car and after that, they can make a decision as to what transmission they want to have (If there is any choice by then!). I think the general population looks at cars more and more as just transportation from A to B and they want the least amount of interaction available to them. It's a sad realization for me, but I think it's accurate.
You seemingly have the "appliance people" who want to get from A to B and don't want to be involved any more than they have to. You have the performance hounds who want the fastest thing on wheels and the DCT will always deliver that. Then you have the "enthusiast" group who want to feel a part of the process and feel connected even if it ultimately means sacrificing some speed to do so.

That third demographic is smaller by the day.
 

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Then you have the "enthusiast" group who want to feel a part of the process and feel connected even if it ultimately means sacrificing some speed to do so.
I have always been in this demographic until I experience the amazing DCT in the 2020 GT500. I initially thought it would be boring... BOY was I wrong! I find the paddle shifting to be engaging and fun as hell! When it’s time to have fun, I hit the “M” button and lock out the automated shifts. When it’s time to get serious, I have learned that “D” (for drive: auto) is where it’s at! It will nail shifts perfectly at 7500 rpms. Trying to replicate that myself leads me to either shift early or hit the rev limiter.

My manual Mustangs aren’t going anywhere, but my new girlfriend likes to be paddled.
 

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I know we've beaten this subject to death. My two grandkids will learn to drive a six speed manual on my 2010 Fusion; like it or not! Last year, Greg, (blackcad55) suggested that we should first teach our kids on an automatic so they could concentrate on steering, braking, and speed control. Once they are comfortable with those skills, move on to a manual. Makes good sense to me and that's what I'll do. I want them to, at least, experience the art of shifting a manual equipped car and after that, they can make a decision as to what transmission they want to have (If there is any choice by then!). I think the general population looks at cars more and more as just transportation from A to B and they want the least amount of interaction available to them. It's a sad realization for me, but I think it's accurate.
Plus people today are lazier than ever. I am surprised that their fingers aren't huge and out of proportion to the rest of their body. If they don't have computer or a huge phone well then life might as well end for them because there's nothing to do and God forbid they do anything physical like play outside (kids of course) or manuel labor.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You seemingly have the "appliance people" who want to get from A to B and don't want to be involved any more than they have to. You have the performance hounds who want the fastest thing on wheels and the DCT will always deliver that. Then you have the "enthusiast" group who want to feel a part of the process and feel connected even if it ultimately means sacrificing some speed to do so.

That third demographic is smaller by the day.
That's well put/summarized, Kyle. (y)
 

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.... the world, it does keep a changin' ........

I can remember my Dad used to enjoy knowing how to hand-crank an old Model T and be able to adjust the spark and fuel levers ... something that I never did have any interest in, so I guess I can understand newer generations not being interested in setting points, adjusting carburetors, rolling up windows, and using a clutch and shift lever ...... time marches on .... :)
 

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.... the world, it does keep a changin' ........

I can remember my Dad used to enjoy knowing how to hand-crank an old Model T and be able to adjust the spark and fuel levers ... something that I never did have any interest in, so I guess I can understand newer generations not being interested in setting points, adjusting carburetors, rolling up windows, and using a clutch and shift lever ...... time marches on .... :)
While I fully understand how great the new 10-speed automatic is in the new "500", there is just something traditional inside of me that requires a manual transmission when owning a high-horsepower car. Just a thing with me. My wife had a new VW CC VR6-4Motion for a few years. Really nice car. It had paddle shifters, plus it had only 280 HP. But it could move with the horsepower it had, all-wheel drive and a quick shifting auto. BUT, for me, something was lost in that. A Shelby should have a manual tranny.
 

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While I fully understand how great the new 10-speed automatic is in the new "500", there is just something traditional inside of me that requires a manual transmission when owning a high-horsepower car. Just a thing with me. My wife had a new VW CC VR6-4Motion for a few years. Really nice car. It had paddle shifters, plus it had only 280 HP. But it could move with the horsepower it had, all-wheel drive and a quick shifting auto. BUT, for me, something was lost in that. A Shelby should have a manual tranny.

Ok, 2 things.

1. The GT500 doesn't have the 10 speed automatic, it has a 7 speed dual clutch setup.
2. The VW CC VR6-4 Motion had the dual clutch setup, but juding the transmission off of that car is like saying that all turbochargers are bad in performance cars because you once drove a Ford Fiesta with the turbo 3 cylinder and it wasn't very fun.

While we are all entitled to our own opinions here, and some people will always prefer a manual, having a DCT in a 760hp car allows you to not only perform better, but also keep both hands on the wheel at 10/10th's driving
 

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Ok, 2 things.

1. The GT500 doesn't have the 10 speed automatic, it has a 7 speed dual clutch setup.
2. The VW CC VR6-4 Motion had the dual clutch setup, but juding the transmission off of that car is like saying that all turbochargers are bad in performance cars because you once drove a Ford Fiesta with the turbo 3 cylinder and it wasn't very fun.

While we are all entitled to our own opinions here, and some people will always prefer a manual, having a DCT in a 760hp car allows you to not only perform better, but also keep both hands on the wheel at 10/10th's driving
Good points.
 

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Motor trend had a article that in 2019 less than 2% of all cars sold in the U.S. were manuals. and the trend for 2020 looks lower. manuals are coming to an end.
 

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It is because the younger generations cannot text and drive a manual. No one in my family can drive a manual so I don't have to share the Shelby with anyone, which is a small victory. I refuse to teach my wife and daughter how to drive a stick on my tuned Shelby. No effing way.

My wife still doesn't understand why I wont reply to her texts when I am driving the Shelby. I keep telling her, but...like there isn't anything more i can explain.

My 7 year old boy wants his first car to be a mustang. If I am able to get him one, then I will do my best to make it a manual so he can have options if I can get him hooked on muscle/sports cars.


Hey it is the best new theft deterrent system so I could leave mine unlocked and running and it would most likely be safe. Hey maybe I can set up a booth and sell opportunities to see if young people can steal it. Charge $20 a try.

I could actually afford a 2020 GT500 with in a few days.
 

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My first experience with paddle-shifting was a Nissan rental sedan with paddles that could shift the automatic transmission. I was excited to “give it a go.” When you pulled a paddle, your shift request was sent to committee for review. It then got mailed to a government office in DC where a shift-study was initiated. After much debate and review, your request would get approved and the next gear was emailed to your spam folder. After digging through your spam, you pulled out the approved request and you were awarded with a shift! Fun... NO! Satisfying... not a chance! I could have easily concluded that all paddle-shifting cars suck!

I purged my mind of my bad experience and went to the Vegas 2020 GT500 unveiling event with an open mind. My first event was the road course. I selected “M” and 100% used the paddles on the track. I was immediately hooked and the new #1 fan! :eek: The paddles are frigg’n fun AF! I also saw that in auto-mode, the tranny is hella-smart and always has you in the correct gear at any given moment. The pro driver said he cannot out-shift the tranny using M and gets his best times in D. Not only is the tranny banging out shifts at lightning speed, but keeping the hands on the wheel allows you to completely focus on accelerating/turning/braking.

I’ve said it before and it’s worth repeating, the people that turn their noses up at the new car and its DCT have no idea what they are missing. I suspect spending some time in the car will make them see the light.

196723
 
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