Ford Shelby GT500 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have read a lot about the different wheel and tire combinations available and would like to get your boiled down opinions of what is out there. I don't want to go with a custom wheel as I don't have the cash right now and I want to stay with 18". What 18" options are available that will clear the front brake. I know it is very limited.

Thanks in advance for your help

Wyroadking
08 gt500
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,466 Posts
The only non-custom 18" wheel that I know of that fits over the Brembos is the stock wheel. The 18" KR Alcoa wheel should fit, but it's not available yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,077 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
I know from personal experience that the CS56 does require a spacer to clear the Brembo calipers. I am in the process of fitting mine almost as we speak. The tires are due tomorrow, so I should have them mounted early next week.
Here's the deal for those who care. When I got my CS56 wheels (that the fitment matrix said would fit the GT500) I figured I would test them anyway before going off to the tire guy. They clear the caliper, but not the paint on the caliper. That's it in a nutshell. To make one of my typically long stories short, I bought a set of H&R 5mm (~ 0.190") spacers, stock# 1065705, from Livermore Performance in CA. The instructions of the H&R website (I think that's where I saw this) say you need at least 8 full turns on the lug nut on the 1/2"-20 studs to secure the wheel safely. With the 5mm spacer and the CS56 I got 7-1/4 turns. CRAP. After some more research, the only long studs I could find that had the correct 'knurl diameter' were the ARP 100-7714 Mustang II (don't say it!) front wheel studs which I got from Jegs. I shortened them and turned 1/4" at the end to remove the threads like the stock studs. To determine the correct new stud length, I got a new stock replacement Ford front wheel stud, then placed it against the ARP stud such that the end of the flanged end of the stock stud matched up with the inner edge of the flange of the ARP stud. In other words, the overall length of the ARP stud was longer than the stock stud by the thickness of the ARP stud flange - about 1/4". I did not put a flat on the ARP stud flange the way the stck stud has a flat spot, and it was not necessary - installation had no clearance issues.
I used a drift punch and hammer to drive the stock stud out of the front wheel hub. It takes a few smart whacks, but no sledgehammer blows, please. If you align the stud you want to remove with the center of the caliper (the wheel hub at the 9 o'clock position on the passenger side, the 3 o'clock position on the driver's side) you can push it right out the back without hitting anything. I put WD40 on the hole in the wheel hub, and used an old lug nut to pull the stud into the hub. A word of caution: have several lug nuts handy because you will probably gall the flat end surface after a few studs. (I used the conical end of the lug to seat the stud for the first two turns, then turned the lug nut over so that the flat surface faced the wheel hub / brake rotor for the heavy work of pulling the stud all the way home.) Also, have a large flat washer handy to put under the lug nut so it does not gall or scrape the outer face of the brake rotor hat. Finally, I had to use an air impact wrench to torque the lug nuts sufficiently to pull the stud in. It was too hard to try doing it by hand and holding the rotor from turning at the same time. I would turn the nut 3 - 4 turns, then stop and look behind the hub at the stud flange to ensure it was going in straight and true. Had no problems with any of the ten studs, just work carefully. Doing it this way meant not having to remove the caliper and wheel hub.
When I tested my work again with the spacer in place and the CS56 rims, I was able to get twelve turns on the lug nut until itsecured the wheel. Plenty of margin.
A final word about the length of the ARP studs. I chose the length carefully after measuring the inside of the stock GT500 lug nuts. I verified that the stock wheels - without the spacers - will fit without bottoming the stud on the inside of the cap of the stock lug nuts. So, if for any reason I change wheels or go back to the stock rims, I can take out the spacer and be back to stock again.
HTH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,016 Posts
Nice write-up, John.

Always good to read information from you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Orf -
Glad to be able to give back something since I have learned a lot from others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,077 Posts
Agree... very nice post 3C.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Three Cobras nice write up! I might suggest another option since you were so close on thread count. You can change lugs nuts, I found Gorilla and Mcguard have more threads to the end were the stock ones don't start right aways. I think you get about 1-1 1/2 turns more than stock. Just might be a little easier than changing studs out unless you already did that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Three Cobras nice write up! I might suggest another option since you were so close on thread count. You can change lugs nuts, I found Gorilla and Mcguard have more threads to the end were the stock ones don't start right aways. I think you get about 1-1 1/2 turns more than stock. Just might be a little easier than changing studs out unless you already did that.
Well, the problem is that there are only so many threads showing on the stock stud outside of the CS56 (or stock) wheel and spacer. The last quarter of an inch of the stud has no threads, but if it did that would solve the problem and longer studs wouldn't be required. I think the maximum threads for the stock lug nut is about twelve anyway since the entire inner part of the lug nut is not threaded - there's a hollow dome inside. So a lug nut with more threads internally still wouldn't buy you anything unless the stud had more threads accessible. The wheels have a conical seat, not a flat seat for the lug nut, so you're not able to have a longer-shouldered lug nut which goes deeper into the wheel and engages more threads.
Yup, I've already replaced the studs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Just to clarify my comments so it doesn't sound as though I think my way is the only way. My rule is: your car, yuor choice, your business. I just wasn't willing to cut things to the proverbial gnat's ass. I decided to go for more than the minimum number of threads because that's my way of doing business for the most part. I measured 0.383" of thread exposed above the CS56 wheel's flat surface. Even allowing for another few 'thou worth of thread in the conical seat, I just decided not to push it. Since 0.400" times 20 threads per inch came out to exactly 8 turns, but at least half the first thread is tapered, and . . . . Well, you get the picture. I'm putting out what I learned, others can use it or not as they see fit and get no arguments from me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I agree on doing what's best makes you comfortable. The factory stuff is usally over engineered so a few threads off I was comfortable with. How much longer did the ARP's compare to stock?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
I cut about 1/2" off the ARP studs as I recall. You're right about the comfort level - each makes their own informed choice. Next week my project is done as the tires get mounted! Yessssssss!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I cut about 1/2" off the ARP studs as I recall. You're right about the comfort level - each makes their own informed choice. Next week my project is done as the tires get mounted! Yessssssss!
Thanks and good luck on your project!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Well, here's the result of my efforts. I really like the looks - better in person than the compressed images here.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,724 Posts
Well, here's the result of my efforts. I really like the looks - better in person than the compressed images here.



Sweet,nice job.Very good write up also.Nice ride,beautiful color.I see you have good taste.:bandit:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
If you want an inexpensive 18" option that easily clears the front brakes, then you need to consider the FordGT knockoffs from CTR Wheels. I have a set of 18x9(f) and 18x10(r) on my car running the stock tires, front and back.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Thanks, neighbor-adiater. Did I tell you you have great taste in cars?
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top